The Illinois State medical register. 1874/75

Front Cover
W.T. Keener, 1874
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 68 - A physician ought not to take charge of or prescribe for a patient who has recently been under the care of another member of the faculty in the same illness, except in cases of sudden emergency, or in consultation with the physician previously in attendance, or when the latter has relinquished the case, or been regularly notified that his services are no longer desired.
Page 74 - ... enormities committed by quackery, and the injury to health and even destruction of life caused by the use of quack medicines, to enlighten the public on these subjects, to expose the injuries sustained by the unwary from the devices and pretensions of artful empirics and impostors. Physicians ought to use all the influence which they may possess, as professors in Colleges of Pharmacy, and by exercising their option in regard to the shops to which their prescriptions shall be sent, to discourage...
Page 74 - The benefits accruing to the public, directly and indirectly, from the active and unwearied beneficence of the profession, are so numerous and important, that physicians are justly entitled to the utmost consideration and respect from the community. The public ought likewise to entertain a just appreciation of medical qualifications; to make a proper discrimination between true science and the assumption of ignorance and empiricism...
Page 66 - ... in attendance ; the practice of the latter, if necessary, should be justified as far as it can be, consistently with a conscientious regard for truth, and no hint or insinuation should be thrown out which could impair the confidence reposed in him or affect his reputation. The consulting physician should also carefully refrain from any of those extraordinary attentions or assiduities, which are too often practiced by the dishonest for the base purpose of gaining applause, or ingratiating themselves...
Page 52 - ... of a fatal malady, by alleviating pain and other symptoms, and by soothing mental anguish. To decline attendance, under such* circumstances, would be sacrificing to fanciful delicacy and mistaken liberality, that moral duty, which is independent of and far superior to all pecuniary consideration. 6. Consultations should be promoted in difficult or protracted cases, as they give rise to confidence, energy, and more enlarged views in practice.
Page 65 - The responsibility must be equally divided between the medical attendants — they must equally .share the credit of success as well as the blame of failure.
Page 58 - It is also incumbent upon the faculty to be temperate in all things, for the practice of physic requires the unremitting exercise of a clear and vigorous understanding; and, on emergencies, for which no professional man should be unprepared, a steady hand, an acute eye, and an unclouded head may be essential to the well-being, and even to the life, of a fellow-creature. 3. It is derogatory to the dignity of the profession to resort to public advertisements, or private cards, or handbills, inviting...
Page 60 - All practitioners of medicine, their wives, and their children while under the paternal care, are entitled to the gratuitous services of any one or more of the faculty residing near them, whose assistance may be desired. A physician afflicted with disease is usually an incompetent judge of his own case; and the natural anxiety and solicitude which he experiences at the sickness of a wife, a child, or any one who, by the ties of consanguinity, is rendered peculiarly dear to him, tend to obscure his...
Page 73 - There is no profession, by the members of which eleemosynary services are more liberally dispensed than the medical, but justice requires that some limits should be placed to the performance of such good offices. Poverty, professional brotherhood, and certain of the public...
Page 70 - ... direction of another physician, in consequence of some sudden change or aggravation of symptoms. The conduct to be pursued on such an occasion, is to give advice adapted to present circumstances; to interfere no further than is absolutely necessary with the general plan of treatment; to assume no...

Bibliographic information