mind

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Page 43 - Consider what effects, that might conceivably have practical bearings, we conceive the object of our conception to have. Then, our conception of these effects is the whole of our conception of the object.
Page 588 - Davidson.— THE LOGIC OF DEFINITION, Explained and Applied. By WILLIAM L. DAVIDSON, MA Crown 8vo, 6s. Green (THOMAS HILL).— THE WORKS OF.
Page 94 - Where, not the person's own character, but the traditions or customs of other people are the rule of conduct, there is wanting one of the principal ingredients of human happiness, and quite the chief ingredient of individual and social progress.
Page 211 - The creed which accepts as the foundation of morals, Utility, or the Greatest Happiness Principle, holds that actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness, wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.
Page 211 - It is quite compatible with the principle of utility to recognize the fact that some kinds of pleasure are more desirable and more valuable than others.
Page 300 - The idea of existence, then, is the very same with the idea of what we conceive to be existent.
Page 329 - Those modes of the Unknowable which we call motion, heat, light, chemical affinity, &c., are alike transformable into each other, and into those modes of the Unknowable which we distinguish as sensation, emotion, thought : these, in their turns, being directly or indirectly re-transformable into the original shapes.
Page 210 - It results from the preceding considerations, that there is in reality nothing desired except happiness. Whatever is desired otherwise than as a means to some end beyond itself, and ultimately to happiness, is desired as itself a part of happiness, and is not desired for itself until it has become so.
Page 204 - We need not, however, rest satisfied with an induction from these instances yielded by the essential vital functions ; for it is an inevitable deduction from the hypothesis of Evolution, that races of sentient creatures could have come into existence under no other conditions.
Page 301 - Notes on Inductive Logic. Book I. Being an Introduction to Mill's System of Logic. By TW LEVIN, HA 3.

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