A Rag, a Bone and a Hank of Hair

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Oxford University Press, Nov 9, 2000 - Children's stories - 118 pages
3 Reviews
A thrilling futuristic novel set at the end of the 22nd century. The government is cloning new people and has manufactured a 1940s wartime family who are unaware that nothing they know is real. Our hero is sent to monitor these 'Reborns' and gradually becomes aware of a horrible underlying secret. A brilliant plot twist at the end turns the book on its head. An exciting sci-fi novel which will appeal especially to boy readers, with the topical subject of cloning. This extraordinarily prophetic 80's novel, which was published in the Oxford Children's Modern Classics series in 1999, is now reissued in a smaller, mass-market paperback format.
 

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User Review  - atreic - LibraryThing

I honestly don't know how I would review this if I was reading it for the first time. I was quite snarky about the Divergent trilogy, would I find myself writing that the world is sketchy and ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I really want to find out what happens to Brin. Well I think Brin is a reborn and the seniors caused the leakage and they convinced. Well anyway, I loved it so far.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
6
Section 2
8
Section 3
17
Section 4
18
Section 5
20
Section 6
32
Section 7
37
Section 8
42
Section 13
59
Section 14
63
Section 15
77
Section 16
84
Section 17
88
Section 18
97
Section 19
102
Section 20
103

Section 9
46
Section 10
51
Section 11
53
Section 12
57
Section 21
104
Section 22
109
Section 23
110
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Nicholas Fisk is the pseudonym for David Higginbottom who was born in London, England on October 14, 1923. He was educated at Ardingly College in West Sussex, but left school at the age of 16 because his father died. He worked as a theatrical agent, a jazz-guitarist, and a cartoonist for the Daily Sketch. During World War II, he served as an RAF meteorological officer. After the war, he worked for the publishers Lund Humphries and in advertising before moving to a career as an author. His non-fiction works included Look at Cars, Lindbergh the Lone Flier, and Richthofen the Red Baron. His first novel for children, The Bouncers, was published in 1964. His other children's novels included The Fast Green Car, Space Hostages, Trillions, Grinny, and A Rag, a Bone and a Hank of Hair. He also wrote a memoir entitled Pig Ignorant. He stopped writing in 1996 because his failing eyesight due to macular degeneration made it impossible. He died on May 10, 2016 at the age of 92.

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