The Philosophical Review, Volume 20

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Jacob Gould Schurman, James Edwin Creighton, Frank Thilly, Gustavus Watts Cunningham
Cornell University Press, 1911 - Philosophy
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Page 422 - rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show.
Page 422 - Brief and powerless is man's life; on him and all his race the slow, sure doom falls pitiless and dark. Blind to good and evil, reckless of destruction, omnipotent matter rolls on its relentless way...
Page 423 - Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show. The true spirit of delight, the exaltation, the sense of being more than man, which is the touchstone of the highest excellence, is to be found in mathematics as surely as in poetry.
Page 698 - THE METAPHYSIC OF EXPERIENCE. Book I. General Analysis of Experience ; Book II. Positive Science ; Book III. Analysis of Conscious Action ; Book IV. The Real Universe. 4 vols. 8vo, 36s.
Page 24 - Disregarding the over-beliefs, and confining ourselves to what is common and generic, we have in the fact that the conscious person is continuous with a wider self through which saving experiences come, 1 a positive content of religious experience which, it seems to me, is literally and objectively true as far as it goes.
Page 7 - The world experienced (otherwise called the 'field of consciousness') comes at all times with our body as its centre, centre of vision, centre of action, centre of interest. Where the body is is 'here'; when the body acts is 'now'; what the body touches is 'this'; all other things are 'there' and 'then
Page 7 - Sustaining, persevering, striving, paying with effort as we go, hanging on, and finally achieving our intention — this is action, this is effectuation in the only shape in which, by a pure experiencephilosophy, the whereabouts of it anywhere can be discussed. Here is creation in its first intention, here is causality at work.
Page 424 - Every judgment is a relation of a mind to several objects, one of which is a relation ; the judgment is true when the relation which is one of the objects relates the other objects, otherwise it is false.
Page 560 - In order, then, that the social pact may not be a vain formulary, it tacitly includes this engagement, which can alone give force to the others, that whoever refuses to obey the general will shall be constrained to do so by the whole body; which means nothing else than that he shall be forced to be free...
Page 139 - There are innumerable consciousnesses of emptiness, no one of which taken in itself has a name, but all different from each other. The ordinary way is to assume that they are all emptinesses of consciousness, and so the same state. But the feeling of an absence is toto coelo other than the absence of a feeling. It is an intense feeling.

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