Practically religious: worldly benefits and the common religion of Japan

Front Cover
University of Hawaiʻi Press, 1998 - History - 303 pages
Praying for practical benefits (genze riyaku) is a common religious activity in Japan. Despite its widespread nature and the vast numbers of people who pray and purchase amulets and talismans for everything from traffic safety and education success to business prosperity and protection from disease, the practice has been virtually ignored in academic studies or relegated to the margins as a product of superstition or an aberration from the true dynamics of religion. Basing their work on a fusion of textual, ethnographic, historical, and contemporary studies, the authors of this volume demonstrate the fallacy of such views, showing that, far from being marginal, the concepts and practices surrounding genze riyaku lie at the very heart of the Japanese religious world.

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Contents

Settings and Dynamics
37
Benefits
50
Practical Benefits Religious Institutions and Ritual
60
Copyright

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