Wittgenstein on Mind and Language

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Oxford University Press, 1995 - Philosophy - 226 pages
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Drawing on ten years of research on the unpublished Wittgenstein papers, Stern investigates what motivated Wittgenstein's philosophical writing and casts new light on the Tractatus and Philosophical Investigations. The book is an exposition of Wittgenstein's early conception of the nature of representation and how his later revision and criticism of that work led to a radically different way of looking at mind and language. It also explains how the unpublished manuscripts and typescripts were put together and why they often provide better evidence of the development of his ideas than can be found in his published writing. In doing so, the book traces the development of a number of central themes in Wittgenstein's philosophy, including his conception of philosophical method, the picture theory of meaning, the limits of language, the application of language to experience, his treatment of private language, and what he called the "flow of life." Arguing that Wittgenstein's views are often much more simple (and more radical) than we have been led to believe, Wittgenstein on Mind and Language provides an overview of the development of Wittgenstein's philosophy and brings to light aspects of his philosophy that have been almost universally neglected.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
Logic and Language
35
Subject and Object
53
From Logical Atomism to Practical Holism
91
The Description of Immediate Experience
128
The Flow of Life
160
Passages from the Unpublished Wittgenstein Papers Nachlass
193
Bibliography
205
Index
211
Index of Quotations
223
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

David G. Stern is at University of California, Berkeley.

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