Reflections on the Revolution in France

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 1999 - History - 326 pages
Edmund Burke was the dominant political thinker of the last quarter of the eighteenth century in England. His reputation depends less on his role as a practising politician than on his ability to set contemporary problems within a wider context of political theory. Above all, he commented onchange. He tried to teach lessons about how change should be managed, what limits should not be transgressed, and what should be reverently preserved. Burke's generation was much in need of advice on these matters. The Industrial Revolution, the American Revolution, and catastrophically, the FrenchRevolution presented challenges of terrible proportions. They could promise paradise or threaten anarchy. Burke was acutely aware of how high the stakes were. The Reflections on the Revolution in France was a dire warning of the consequences that would follow the mismanagement of change.
 

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User Review  - DinadansFriend - LibraryThing

Edmund Burke, MP was not in favour of popular enthusiasms, and when they rise to actual violence, well that is beyond the pale. Even though there may well have been reasons for the uprising, there ... Read full review

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User Review  - smallself - LibraryThing

I try to scrape all unfavorable reviews down to an absolute minimum of length, so here goes: Burke thinks that the answer to everything is common sense, although his term for “common sense” was ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

REFLECTIONS ON THE REVOLUTION IN FRANCE
3
Letter to a Member of the National Assembly
251
Explanatory Notes
293

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About the author (1999)

Born and educated in Oxford, Leslie Mitchell is also the author of Charles James Fox (1992, #25).

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