Celebrity-in-chief: How Show Business Took Over the White House

Front Cover
Westview Press, 2004 - Political Science - 354 pages
1 Review
U.S. presidents and Hollywood have had a mutual admiration society that extends far back into history. In Celebrity-in-Chief, journalist Alan Schroeder contends that each camp has influenced the other-particularly over the past century-creating a president who no longer stands apart upon a remote civic pedestal, isolated from Hollywood and pop culture. Instead, the powerful forces of the American celebrity circus drag him into the tent and ask him to put on a show. The job of president has always been politically demanding, but now there is another requirement: to exude star quality. In the parlance of Hollywood, he must "fill the frame." Drawing upon a wealth of fascinating anecdotes about some of the most celebrated individuals in American history, Schroeder shows how a succession of presidents since Woodrow Wilson has put on a show with mixed results. Whether it was Bill Clinton playing sax on TV talk shows or George W. Bush's Top Gun stunt aboard an aircraft carrier, Celebrity-in-Chief entertainingly and convincingly shows that the result is a wholesale demystification of the office-and that this marriage of pop culture and the presidency will continue to fascinate and endure.

What people are saying - Write a review

Celebrity-in-chief: how show business took over the White House

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Television producer Schroeder (journalism, Northeastern Univ.; Presidential Debates: 40 Years of High-Risk TV) captures the dilemmas that Presidents have faced during the Media Age when they have ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

References to this book

About the author (2004)

Alan Schroeder is an associate professor in the School of Journalism at Northeastern University. A three-time Emmy-award-winning television producer and a frequent media commentator, he is the author of Presidential Debates: 40 Years of High-Risk TV. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Bibliographic information