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Review: The Book Thief Audiobook

Editorial Review - Bookreporter.com

It's just a small story really, about among other things: a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fistfighter, and quite a lot of thievery… Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak's groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she ... Read full review

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Random stories and broken quotes that have interesting and beautiful adjectives (although often excessively descriptive), but little more of interest. Too much cursing and blaspheming. The book is cliche after cliche, like the author is trying way too hard to invent yet another new spin on the overdone Nazi Germany/WWII theme. Slightly glorifies communism, with a hint of antisemitism. Very long with too many empty words, and no deeper meaning than the piecemeal story that is foisted on the reader. Spoilers also ruin the plot before each part. Overall, I was little moved by the entire thing. The copious praise this book has received is lost on me. 

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very guud 100/10 first book to make me cry lol good book 10/10

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This book is amazing! When I had to stop at the end of a chapter I thought, "just one more."

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realy good

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I need all of the pages.

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“It amazes me what humans can do, even when streams are flowing down their faces and they stagger on...”
― Markus Zusak, The Book Thief
Nobody needs a review from me of a book that's been around
forever, but I was so affected by this one that I feel a need to at least commemorate that much. I read it a few weeks ago, and the characters are still with me. I'm still affected by this book, and I'm sure I will be for a very long time.
I can't believe it was only intended for kids/young adults. I also think - after rereading books I read when I was far too young, that it's almost silly to have younger kids read books with such subtle nuances. Just because you can read something doesn't mean you will fully absorb what the book has to offer -- and that's true at any age.
It says ages 12 and up. Maybe, I guess. I don't really know a lot about kids, so perhaps I'm way off, but I'm finding that a lot of the books I was given in school were just a touch beyond where I was as a human being when I read them. I loved books. I loved reading. I'm thrilled I read The Catcher in the Rye back then since I didn't like it nearly as much as an adult, and I credit Holden Caulfield with saving my young life.
“Certain things, they should stay the way they are. You ought to be able to stick them in one of those big glass cases and just leave them alone.”
― Holden, Catcher in the Rye
That's what I should have done with that book. Anyway...
This one is a bit different. I think it has a lot to say about what is often painted as pure evil: Germany during the Holocaust and the subtleties included in a situation like PaPa fighting for the Third Reich. As an American 12 year old, would I know that invasive poverty and love/ wanting to protect your family would conflict with your own moral imperatives? Would I understand the self-sacrifice involved in something like that? I honestly don't know. I suppose if I had a great teacher, maybe I would. On my own, I'm not so sure.
As an adult though, I loved this book. It's a terrific lesson on why nobody should count out any genre or classification: you could miss an awesome book! I tend to avoid super-hyped books if I haven't read them before the hype, so that's probably what put me off this one.
In January 2018, though, I cried so hard during parts that I just gave in to it at one point and doubled over sobbing in my kitchen with the water running. I went through an entire box of tissues. I loved these characters more than my own family. I want to read it again already.
It's really good at showing the humanity and the ease with which good people can find themselves caught up in a morally perilous situation that is, on the other side, a life-threatening situation. Every character in this book is fully realized and so real, they come off the pages. I will never forget Rudy and PaPa, Max and Liesel, and the relationships between them all especially caught my heart. Liesel's a tough little girl who is so very vulnerable and only feels safe enough to express that at the height of the second world war in a horrendously awful situation, but to her: it's the best her life has ever been. It's really very very tragic. I'm tearing up right now!
To top the whole thing off, we have Death as narrator. I know some people in my book club hated this. I adored him. He was so kind and gentle, so genuine and wise. He was also dangerously seductive, and most of all, he felt like a dear old grandpa to me. While humans may break his heart, he broke mine. I honestly loved this book, and I'm guessing that waiting a decade plus after the hype helped me get to it in an unfettered way.
Oh, PS, I loved the book so much, I decided to rent the movie, and BOY was that a huge let-down. I didn't even cry any tears until the very end, and that may have just been relief that the film was ending. It wasn't horrible, but in comparison to the book: no comparison.
 

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This is one of my favorite books! Who would've thought that death could be so much like us living beings? I think that's a lot of what Markus was trying to get across. Death is so much like us, he can relate to us, and distractions help him get through things. Most importantly, death has a heart. Also, the characters are so deep. Most of you would probably say that you like Rudy, but for real, I like Hans. Actually, Rudy was Markus' favorite character, and it was "very hard to kill him." But, as I have learned, authors can kill whoever they want to kill. (Veronica Roth!!!!!!!) But readers can respond however we want to respond.
Me: *SOB SOB SOB SOB SOB*
In short: READ THIS BOOK!!!!!
 

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The Book Thief is so amazing that once you start reading it, you can't leave it.
This book is about a German girl named Liesel Meminger who just wants to read books, this book is basically set during
the time of World War 2, actually a few years before World War 2.
The whole story is narrated in such a way that people just cannot stop reading. They come for more.
 

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The Book Thief is narrated by Death (yup, you heard that right) who tells us the story of Liesel Meminger. It's January 1939, and ten year old Liesel is traveling by train with her mother and her little brother Werner. Liesel and Werner are being taken to the small town of Molching, just outside of Munich, Germany, to live with foster parents Hans and Rosa Hubermann.
Werner dies on the train of mysterious causes having to do with poverty, hunger, cold, and lack of medical treatment. Before Liesel arrives in Molching, she attends her brother's burial in a snowy graveyard. She steals The Grave Digger's Handbook from the cemetery after it falls from a young grave digger's coat. The kicker is... Liesel can't read.
Liesel is reluctant to enter the Hubermann house on Himmel Street, but is coaxed by her foster father, Hans, to whom she takes an immediate liking. She's not sure about Rosa, though. Liesel begins school, but suffers because she doesn't know how to read yet. She also meets Rudy Steiner, who is soon to be her best friend (not to mention her partner in book and food thievery).
One night, Hans finds The Grave Digger's Handbook hidden in Liesel's mattress after her usual nightmare of seeing her brother dying on the train. This is what inspires him to begin teaching her to read. When Liesel learns to write, she begins composing letters to her mother, but these letters go unanswered. Finally, we find out that her mother has disappeared.
Liesel becomes aware of what it really means to be living in Nazi Germany when a book burning is organized to celebrate Adolph Hitler's birthday on April 20, 1940. She finds the mound of literature being burned fascinating but super-disturbing. Now that she can read and write, she has come to see great value in books and words. When Liesel hears a Nazi spokesman calling for death to communists as well as Jews, a light bulb goes off. The only thing she knows about her father is that he was accused of being a communist. She realizes that Hitler is likely behind her father's disappearance, her brother's death, and her mother's disappearance.
When Hans confirms her suspicions after the book burning, Hitler becomes Liesel's sworn enemy. This is a dangerous conflict for a young girl in Nazi Germany. Hans warns her against voicing her anti-Hitler opinions in public. This conflict helps drive Liesel to steal her second book, The Shoulder Shrug, from the burning pile of books.
Turns out that Erik Vandenburg, a Jewish man, saved Hans's life during World War I, giving up his own life in the process. After the war, Hans visited Erik's widow and young son. Now, that son is twenty-two and is hiding from the Nazis. His name is Max, and Hans is his last hope for survival.
Upon learning of his plight, Hans readily helps arrange for Max's journey to Himmel Street. When the desperately starving and exhausted young man arrives, Hans and Rosa hide him in their home. At first, Liesel isn't sure what to think of Max, but they soon make fast friends. Meanwhile, Max's arrival and his suffering produce a change in Rosa, for the better. Liesel is amazed to see her courage and her softness.
 

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