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This book is one of the best books you will ever read! It doesn't matter how tough you think you are, you are guaranteed to cry at some point in this book!

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My favourite book in the world, this is always my first recommendation!
A beautiful novel about a girl who is saved by words, based in Nazi Germany,1939. Liesel is fostered by Hans and Rosa
Hubermann, two kind and loving people. Hans, an accordinist who teaches Liesel to read, is a charming and warm character that won't be forgotten.
There is also the comical Rudy, a boy that falls in Love with Liesel, together they go to places near and far, experiencing tears, joy and first Kisses.
I would recommend this book for ages 11 - 111!!!
It will change your life and stay with you forever!
 

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This is one of my all time favorites. Liesel is all alone until she meets her foster parents, Hans and Rosa. She learns to read and steal books. A whole bunch of unexpected twists. Zusak's best book yet. TD

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Very good book.
A must read for anyone. Interesting, refreshing, and innovative.

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For sure read
Great book from an interesting perspective!

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Ok
Lol

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This book is AMAZING. It is one of the best books i have ever read. It is the first human story that has made me cry at the end, (i am more into animal stories), it kept me glued onto every page. If school didnt stop me, i would have read all 500+ pages nonstop until i finished it. I highly recommend this book for anyone who wants a book that is humor, saddness, slight mystery, and a strange twist (death narrating it) all rolled into one.  

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A book that tries far too hard to be school material. Give me even a chapter without a metaphor or simile or any foreshadowing or other literary terms

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Up and coming author Markus Zusak pens a most stunning novel that is sure to be glorified as a modern classic. "The Book Thief" is set in Nazi Germany and centers on Liesel Meminger, a foster child and the titular book thief. The story itself is narrated by Death himself as he chronicles the happenings of Liesel's life as she deals with the death of her brother, steals books, and houses a Jew in her basement.
"The Book Thief" 's charm is imminent from it's first page. Death is a unique narrator, bringing an amusing sense of humor and insightful reflections on human nature. The story holds a light feeling as it centers on the childhood of a girl, yet it also puts forth a foreboding atmosphere as the world around her takes a turn for the worst. Zusak's style is a breath of fresh air, doing such unorthodox things as spoiling the ending from the get go and periodically spoiling major plot points that have not quite happened. Rather than being annoying, these teases are brilliant as the reader already knows what's going to happen, yet the event impacts all the same, even if it was already revealed four chapters before. He also interjects the story with bold, centered statements from the narrator, which range from ironic observations to detailed transcriptions of conversations.
The book truly sets itself apart as it portrays Nazi Germany in a way all its own, a setting that is typically seen in Holocaust memoirs or from the eyes of a soldier. Zusak instead shows Nazi Germany from the perspective of a mildly rebellious German family as they hypocritically “Heil Hitler” and deal with job shortages, horrible food, discrimination from the Nazi party, and air raids. The book itself is inspired by stories about growing up in Nazi Germany that Zusak's parents told him and several of their anecdotes have found their way into the story.
A most motley batch of characters help shape this story, including a Jewish fist fighter, a charming painter/accordionist/father, a stern but loving mother, and a blonde boy obsessed with Jesse Owens. These are Liesel's main companions as she lives out the war and all serve to more deeply immerse the reader as they fall in love with Papa's charm, admire Max's tenacity, laugh at the actions of Rudy and grow fond of Mama's characteristic yelling of “Saumensch!” The characters are diverse, believable and, above all, lovable and help emotionally tie you to the story.
"The Book Thief" is a book I will not be forgetting any time soon. It's unlike anything I've read recently. The style is unique and refreshing, the characters memorable, and the story tragic, happy, and amazing. In fact, "The Book Thief" is just that: a story and nothing more. It is simply the tale of a girl, the people she encounters, and the events she witnesses with no real conflict, no goal, nothing. What draws us in is the witty narrator, the characters and the interesting turn of events as the war starts affecting Liesel and her family more directly. All and all, "The Book Thief" is an amazing work of fiction that deserves to be read and reread by everyone.
 

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The best book I ever read.
Sad, but with blotches of happiness, hope, and fun scattered throughout the book.
The Book Thief is amazing.


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