Perestroika!: The Raucous Rebellion in Political Science

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Yale University Press, Sep 30, 2005 - History - 608 pages

This superb volume describes the events and ramifications of a revolt within the political science discipline that began in 2000 with a disgruntled e-mail message signed by one “Mr. Perestroika.” The message went to seventeen recipients who quickly forwarded it to others, and soon the Perestroika revolt became a major movement calling for change in the American political science community.

What is the Perestroika movement? Why did it occur? What has it accomplished? What remains to be done? Most important, what does it tell us about the nature of political science, about methodological pluralism and diversity, about the process of publishing scholarly work, and about graduate education in the field? The contributors to the book—thoughtful political scientists who offer a variety of perspectives—set the Perestroika movement in historical and comparative contexts. They address many topics related to heart of the debate—a desire for tolerance of methodological diversity—and assess the changes that have come in the wake of Perestroika. For political scientists and their graduate students, and for those interested in the history or sociology of social sciences, this volume is essential reading.

 

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Contents

Parti
7
Not Here Not Now
21
Every Poet His Own Aristotle
45
Letter to a Graduate Student
53
Part 2
61
Rational Choice Symbolic Politics and Pluralism
87
A Return to Politics
103
Interpretation and Institution
136
Part 6
302
Methodological Bias in the APSR
304
The APSR in the Perestroika Era
323
Methodological Bias in
342
Part5
355
The Graduate Student Experience
374
Graduate Education in a Pluralistic Context
403
Quantitative Methods
421

The R Word Narrative and Perestroika
154
Work That Counts
167
Lost in Translation
181
In the House of Science There Are Many Rooms
200
Will the Real Perestroikniks Please Stand
218
Part 3
237
Democracy versus DiversityA False Dichotomy
250
Ironic Representation
265
Introducing Democracy in the APSA
278
Part 4
291
On Curricular Perestroika
434
Assessment
465
After Methodology
489
A Pox on Perestroika a Hex on Hegemony
509
Of Means and Meaning
525
Reforming the Discipline
548
Further Reading
567
Index
583
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About the author (2005)

Kristen Renwick Monroe is professor of political science and philosophy, University of California at Irvine. She is the author or editor of eight previous books.

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