Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English

Front Cover

The " Longman Grammar of Spoken and Written English " is a revolutionary, corpus-based reference grammar of English, based on a groundbreaking research project to analyze the ways in which English grammar is really used. The book looks at four text types "conversation, fiction, news reportage, and academic prose" and reports statistical findings as well as examining the reasons that condition a particular grammatical choice. Encompasses a six-year research project into the ways in which language is really used. Reveals which structures, tenses, and lexical choices occur, and how their distribution differs in different text types. Analyzes natural language in each chapter, based on analysis of the real everyday conversations in the Longman Spoken American Corpus and the British National Corpus. Contains over 350 tables and graphs that show the frequency of constructions across different registers, from conversation to fiction to academic prose. "

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English grammar has gained a much insight from corpus and this volume is thorough in its treatment of this huge topic. A classic reference work that will still be relevant for at least my life time. Read full review

Contents

a corpusbased approach to English grammar
4
Grammaticaldiscourse factors
14
English
20
Dialect distinctions in the LSWE
26
3
31
Academic prose
32
Quantitative findings in
38
2
43
5
625
zero
634
be
636
The form and function of complement clauses
657
4
714
appear
733
substitution in postpredicate
751
Adverbials
761

Other explanatory considerations
44
description and distribution
47
116
49
86
55
8
73
408
74
3
76
distribution
81
5
93
5
112
Clause grammar
119
414
126
2
128
4
134
4
159
Key word classes
227
Nouns pronouns and the simple noun phrase
229
322
250
distribution
270
323
285
gender reference
317
Verbs
357
and complex transitive patterns
387
derivational affixes
401
verbs
409
constructions
427
tense aspect voice and modality
451
Lexical associations of present
459
and have across dialects
466
Active and passive voice
475
passive
481
Individual modalssemimodals across
487
modals and semimodals
493
Adjectives and adverbs
503
Adjectives and adverbs
504
4
510
6
526
More complex structures
571
postmodifying toclause
573
relative clause
608
6
775
6
781
adverbials
796
and manner series
811
8
827
4
840
categories
859
7
879
categories
880
SECTION E Grammar in a wider perspective
893
Overview
895
The grammatical marking of stance
965
speaker or writer
976
Lexical expressions in speech and writing
987
Lexical expressions
988
conversation and academic prose
993
bundles
994
phraseadjective phrase
1019
9
1021
The grammar of conversation
1037
reformulations
1062
utterance launchers
1073
10
1083
formulae
1093
interrogatives
1115
Appendix
1128
339
1147
Lexical index
1148
428
1150
340
1158
Conceptual index
1174
430
1176
342
1182
432
1183
8
1192
446
1195
344
1197
693
1201
Copyright

About the author (1999)

Douglas Biber is Professor of Applied Linguistics (English Department) at Northern Arizona University. His books and articles deal with language use in spoken and written discourse.

Bibliographic information