The Life of John Milton: 1649-1654

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Macmillan, 1877
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Page 478 - Tis madness to resist or blame The face of angry heaven's flame ; And if we would speak true, Much to the Man is due Who, from his private gardens, where He lived reserved and austere (As if his highest plot To plant the bergamot) Could by industrious valour climb To ruin the great work of time, And cast the Kingdoms old Into another mould.
Page 440 - CROMWELL, our chief of men, who, through a cloud Not of war only, but detractions rude, Guided by faith and matchless fortitude, To peace and truth thy glorious way hast plough'd...
Page 197 - I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ, think it possible you may be mistaken.
Page 97 - I tell you, sir," language. ^.d Qromweil, thumping the table as he spoke, " you have no other way to deal with these men but to break them, or they will break you...
Page 428 - A little onward lend thy guiding hand To these dark steps, a little further on; For yonder bank hath choice of sun or shade; There I am wont to sit, when any chance Relieves me from my task of servile toil, Daily in the common prison else enjoin'd me, Where I, a prisoner chain'd, scarce freely draw The air imprison'd also, close and damp, Unwholesome draught.
Page 64 - AND HATH BEEN HELD SO THROUGH ALL AGES, FOR ANY, WHO HAVE THE POWER, TO CALL TO ACCOUNT A TYRANT, OR WICKED KING, AND AFTER DUE CONVICTION, TO DEPOSE, AND PUT HIM TO DEATH; IF THE ORDINARY MAGISTRATE HAVE NEGLECTED, OR DENY'D TO DOE IT. AND THAT THEY, WHO OF LATE, SO MUCH BLAME DEPOSING, ARE THE MEN THAT DID IT THEMSELVES.
Page 477 - He nothing common did, or mean, Upon that memorable scene, But with his keener eye The axe's edge did try ; Nor called the gods with vulgar spite To vindicate his helpless right, But bowed his comely head Down, as upon a bed.
Page 26 - I'll sing thine obsequies with trumpet sounds, And write thine epitaph in blood and wounds.
Page 413 - I have sought the Lord night and day, that He would rather slay me than put me upon the doing of this work.
Page 371 - Dutchmen answered coolly, that they were " sent forth by the High and Mighty Lords, the States General of the United Netherlands...

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