All Men are Mortal: A Novel

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W. W. Norton & Company, 1992 - Fiction - 345 pages
132 Reviews
'All Men Are Mortal' is a captivating exemplum of the existentialist credo. A beautiful and accomplished your actress revives a downcast stranger at a French resort. He becomes thoroughy attached to her at first and confides a terrifying truth; he is immortal. At this point, the power in their relationship shifts. She can think of nothing greater than having her performances remembered forever. She, too, will then become immortal. But having been resuscitated into enjoying life again, this former medieval ruler starts breaking free from her grasp and all notions of morality.

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Review: All Men are Mortal

User Review  - Goodreads

Beauvoir's take on existentialism is uncanny and apt. Describing the eternal cycle of life through the eyes of an immortal man of the 13th century to the 20th century, she is able to subvert the glory ... Read full review

Review: All Men are Mortal

User Review  - Ioana Hodor - Goodreads

One of my favourite books all time. It shows how no matter what we do, we find ourselves in a continuous cycle and there is no way out. Also, it puts the main idea of existentialism in the center and ... Read full review

Selected pages


Section 1
Section 2
Section 3
Section 4
Section 5
Section 6
Section 7
Section 8
Section 16
Section 17
Section 18
Section 19
Section 20
Section 21
Section 22
Section 23

Section 9
Section 10
Section 11
Section 12
Section 13
Section 14
Section 15
Section 24
Section 25
Section 26
Section 27
Section 28
Section 29

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About the author (1992)

Simone de Beauvoir, 1908 - 1986 Simone de Beauvoir was born January 9, 1908 in Paris, France to a respected bourgeois family. Her father was a lawyer, her mother a housewife, and together they raised two daughters to be intelligent, inquisitive individuals. de Beauvoir attended the elementary school Cours Desir in 1913, then L'Institute Sainte Nary under the tutelage of Robert Garric, followed by the Institute Catholique in Paris, before finally attending the Sorbonne, where she graduated from in 1929. It was there that she met the man who would become her life long friend and companion, John Paul Sartre, who contributed to her philosophy of life. She is perhaps best know for her novel entitled "The Second Sex", which describes the ideal that women are an indescribable "other", something "made, not born", and a declaration of feminine independence. After graduating from the Sorbonne, de Beauvoir went on to teach Latin at Lycee Victor Duruy, philosophy at a school in Marseilles, and a few other teaching positions before coming to teach at the Sorbonne. During the course of her twelve years of teaching, from 1931 to 1943, de Beauvoir developed the basis for her philosophical thought. She used her formal philosophy background to also comment on feminism and existentialism. Her personal philosophy was that freedom of choice is man's utmost gift of value. Acts of goodness make one more free, acts of evil decrease that selfsame freedom. In 1945, de Beauvoir and Sartre founded and edited Le Temps Modernes, a monthly review of philosophical thought and trends. In 1943, with the money she had earned from teaching, de Beauvoir turned her full attention to writing, producing first "L'Envitee", then "Pyrrhus et Cineas" in 1944. In 1948, she wrote perhaps her most famous philosophical work, "The Ethics of Ambiguity". "The Second Sex", regarded by many as the seminal work in the field of feminism, is her most famous work. Other works include "The Coming of Age", which addresses society's condemnation of old age, the award winning novel "The Mandarins", "A Very Easy Death", about the death of her mother and a four part biography. In "The Woman Destroyed", a collection of two long stories and one short novel, de Beauvoir discusses middle age. One of her last novels was in the form of a diary recording; it told of the slow death of her life-long compatriot, Jean Paul Sartre. On April 14, 1986, Simone de Beauvoir, one of the mothers of feminism, passed away in her home in Paris.

Leonard M Friedman is a translator of the work Simone de Beauvoir.

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