Notes and Observations on the Ionian Islands and Malta: With Some Remarks on Constantinople and Turkey, and on the System of Quarantine as at Present Conducted, Volume 2

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Smith, Elder, 1842 - Ionian Islands (Greece)
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Page 467 - ... truth, an empire loses all its stability when it ceases to observe its laws. " These considerations have been ever present to our mind, and since the day of our accession to the throne the thought of the public good, of the amelioration of the condition of the provinces, and the alleviation of the national burdens have not ceased to claim our entire attention. If we take into consideration the geographical position of the...
Page 467 - ALL THE MINISTERS, ULEMAS, PACHAS, AND DEPUTATIONS OF NATIONS, SECTS, AND RACES SUBJECT TO THE SULTAN. '' All the world knows that in the first times of the Ottoman monarchy, the precepts of the Koran, and the laws of the empire, were a rule ever honoured ; in consequence of which the empire increased in force and grandeur, and all its subjects, without exception, acquired a greater degree of ease and prosperity. But since a century and a half, a succession of accidents, and different causes, have...
Page 418 - Like smoking, this must be quite an acquired taste. People of all classes in Constantinople use these drinks. A good cup of strong coffee may be had for a farthing, and a glass of sherbet for little more. Their coffee is made in a simple, easy manner, and most expeditiously. When a single cup is called for, the attendant in the coffee-house pours hot water into a little copper pan, or rather pot ; puts it over a charcoal fire for an instant, to make it boil ; then adds a proportion of well-ground...
Page 72 - ... with boracic acid, and then acted on by muriatic acid, its colouring matter is dissolved, siliceous matter remaining, and the solution is slightly precipitated by ammonia. Considering this glazing as a compound of silica and of an alkali, or of an alkaline earth, coloured by iron, it may, I presume, be inferred, that it was applied to the earthenware in the form of a paste, and that the vessels were afterwards subjected to a temperature sufficiently elevated to melt the paste, and convert it...
Page 282 - Here, then, we find that inflammatory affections of the lungs are nearly twice as prevalent in the Mediterranean as among the same number of troops in the United Kingdom, and that in the mild climate of Malta they are also twice as fatal. " These facts, combined with a careful examination of the abstracts in the appendix, lead to the inference that residence in the Mediterranean, though so often recommended to patients labouring under pulmonary affections, is by no means likely to be attended with...
Page 282 - ... any beneficial influence can be exerted by the climate itself, when a body of selected soldiers, subject to no severe duty and exposed to no hardship, lose annually a larger proportion of their number by consumption than in the United Kingdom. This inference, however adverse to generally received opinions, is strikingly corroborated by the prevalence of consumption and other pulmonary affections among the civil inhabitants of Malta, as shown in Appendix, No. III. of this Report.
Page 327 - Maurice.' 81 bat the sacrifice of happiness, the weariness, the- wasted time, the annoyance, the sufferings inflicted by quarantine legislation — these admit of no calculation—they exceed all measure. Nothing but their being a security against danger the most alarming, nothing but their being undoubted protection for the public health, could warrant their infliction ; and the result of my experience is not only that they are useless for the .ends they profess...
Page 468 - ... not super-excellent, he can have no guide but his interest. It is henceforth requisite that each Ottoman subject should pay a certain sum of taxes, proportioned to his fortune and faculties. It is also requisite that special laws should fix and limit the expenses of the military and naval force. " Although the defence of the country is an important and universal duty, and although all classes of the population must furnish soldiers for the purpose, still there ought to be laws to fix the contingent...
Page 294 - ... per thousand of the strength, being scarcely one per thousand less than among the troops, notwithstanding the night exposure of the latter in the course of their military duties.
Page 468 - ... source of revenue still subsists, in the venal concession of offices. By this system, the civil and local administration of each region is delivered up to the arbitrary will of one man ; that is, to the most violent and greedy passions — for if such farmer of the revenue be not super-excellent, he can have no guide but his interest. It is henceforth requisite that each Ottoman subject should pay a certain sum of taxes, proportioned to his fortune and faculties. It is also requisite that special...

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