Scientific Butter-making

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éditeur non identifié, 1883 - Butter - 204 pages
 

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Page 130 - How the devil can you expect to digest food, that you neither take the trouble to dissect, nor time to masticate? It's no wonder you lose your teeth, for you never use them; nor your digestion, for you overload it; nor your saliva, for you expend it on the carpets, instead of your food.
Page 138 - Of late years, light-salted butter sells best, and the rate of salting varies from one-half to three-fourths of an ounce of salt to the pound of butter. The butter, after having been salted and worked, is allowed to stand until evening, and is then worked a second time and packed. In hot weather, as soon as the butter is salted and worked over, it is taken to the pools and immersed in water, where it remains until evening, when it is taken out, worked over, and packed. For this purpose a separate...
Page 152 - ... materially decrease the chances of introduction of foreign matter? First, the well above low water should be made of material impervious to water or by omitting part of the wall altogether. The design of this is that it may not act as a drain for the neighboring soil. The wall of the well may be framed from a point two or three feet from the bottom, made of brick with a coating of hydraulic cement. The earth around should be thoroughly packed so as to prevent the entry of surface waste. To prevent...
Page 95 - There is another important law in the natural economy of the grasses which governs all those species of most value to the farmer, it is this, that individual plants of the same species will not grow close to each other for any length of time, for however thickly planted from seed, in one or two seasons intermediate plants decay and leave vacant spaces, which are soon filled up with spurious grasses, weeds, or moss ; but when a variety of different species, adapted to the soil, are mixed intimately...
Page 137 - C, the movable floats. -. •• is allowed to pass off at one end of the tray. This process is repeated two or three times, when nearly all the buttermilk will have been rinsed away. Salt is now added, and worked through the butter with the butter-worker, at the rate of 18 ounces for 22 Ibs. of butter. Great care is taken that the salt be pure, and of those brands that are known to be free from the chloride of calcium, as a trace of this impurity gives a bitter taste to the butter. For butter that...
Page 147 - ... have failed to settle which is the best form for actual use in the dairy ; for the same machine under different conditions does not always yield the same result The oldest form is the upright or plunge churn. There is a general prejudice in favour of this form of C., on the ground that the butter is more completely separated and of better quality. Its great defect is that the operation, being generally performed by hand, is fatiguing. Recent improvements have chiefly aimed at ease in working,...
Page 133 - The churn is a barrel revolving on a journal at each head, and driven by horse-power. The churning occupies about an hour, and after the buttermilk is drawn off cold water is added and a few turns given to the churn, and the water then drawn off. This is repeated until the water as it is drawn off is nearly free from milkiness. The butter is worked with butterworkers, a dampened cloth meanwhile being pressed upon it to absorb the moisture and free it of traces of buttermilk. The cloth is frequently...
Page 136 - It is provided with a rose nozzle so as to distribute the water over the mass in numberless small streams. The watering-pot is held with the left hand, and the butter worked with the right hand at the same time, by applying the lever, going rapidly over from one side of the mass to the other. " The butter being on the inclined slab or bed-piece of the butter-worker, the buttermilk flows off readily, and by a few movements of the lever the buttermilk is expelled. When the water flows from the mass...
Page 136 - ... of the mass to the other. The butter being on the inclined slab or bed-piece of the butter-worker. the butter-milk flows off readily, and by a few movements of the lever the butter-milk is expelled. When the water flows from, the mass without being discoloured, the process of washing is completed. The water falling in a spray over the whole surface of the butter cools it, and gives the proper degree of hardness for working with the lever, a point of considerable importance, especially in hot...
Page 179 - There is a marked increase in quantity and improvement in quality of milk and butter after changing from riry feed to ensilage, corresponding with the effects of a similar change to fresh pasture. A few seeming exceptions are noted, which will probably find explanation in defects easily remedied, rather than in such as are inherent.

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