Materia medica and therapeutics

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Samuel S. and William Wood, 1859 - 411 pages
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Page 1 - And wi' the lave ilk merry morn Could rank my rig and lass, Still shearing, and clearing The tither stocked raw, Wi' claivers, an' haivers, Wearing the day awa : Ev'n then a wish, (I mind its power,) A wish that to my latest hour Shall strongly heave my breast ; That I for poor auld Scotland's sake, Some usefu' plan, or beuk could make, Or sing a sang at least.
Page 9 - An incoherent assemblage of incoherent opinions, it is, perhaps, of all the physiological sciences, that which best shows the caprice of the human mind.
Page 14 - For children under twelve years, the doses of most medicines must be diminished in the proportion of the age to the age increased by 12; thus, at two years to J, viz.: a ^ =J.
Page 251 - He is confident it would prevent a number of diseases: and he thinks there is no greater luxury, than the comfortable sensation which arises from wearing it, especially after one is a little accustomed to it. " It is a mistaken notion," says he, " that it is too warm a clothing for summer.
Page 9 - It is not a science for a methodical mind. It is a shapeless assemblage of inaccurate ideas, of observations often puerile, of deceptive remedies, and of formula? as fantastically conceived, as they are tediously arranged.
Page 9 - Deobstruent in one case, relaxant in another, the same medicine has been employed with all these opposite views ; so true is it that the mind of man gropes in the dark, when it is guided only by the wildness of opinion.
Page 251 - ... it. It is the warm bath of a perspiration confined by a linen shirt, wet with sweat, which renders the summer heats of southern climates so insupportable ; but flannel promotes perspiration and favors its evaporation, and evaporation, as it is well known produces positive cold.
Page 21 - One hundred thousand men perish from the want of bloodletting, or from its not being timely employed, where one perishes from excessive bleeding, when prescribed by a physician.
Page 251 - I know of no greater luxury than the comfortable sensation which arises from wearing it, especially after one is a little accustomed to it. " It is a mistaken notion that it is too warm a clothing for summer. I have worn it in the hottest climates, and in all seasons of the year, and never found the least inconvenience from it.
Page 9 - The expressions of diluents and attenuants were common before this period. When it was necessary to blunt the acrid particles, they created inviscants, incrassants, &c.

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