Manuscripts in Northumbria in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries

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DS Brewer, 2003 - History - 303 pages
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In the century after the Norman conquest a new elite came to power in northern England, in the old Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Northumbria. The processes of assimilation are followed here through a detailed study of the libraries which belonged to the religious institutions of the region and their surviving manuscripts. The changes in the perception and writing of the region's history are discussed together with the production of the manuscripts in which the works survive. Changes in script, illumination and codicology are demonstrated, and discussed as evidence both of new cultural influences and of interaction between the networks of religious houses in the region. The introduction of new religious orders and their interaction with existing cathedrals and monasteries, and the ongoing role of the cults of the region's major saints are given particular attention, using evidence from the surviving manuscripts. ANNE LAWRENCE-MATHERS is Lecturer in History, University of Reading.
 

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Contents

The influence of the past
12
Durham and the Norman world
27
Manuscript production at Durham in the early
64
Pictorial narrative and the cult of St Cuthbert
89
The Benedictine revival in Northumbria
109
Power and cultural identity
134
Power and cultural identity
147
The Augustinians and their libraries
177
The Cistercians and their libraries
194
Readers of Bede the importance of Bede in
217
Aelred of Rievaulx
236
History and regional identity
252
Bibliography
274
Index
293
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