The Montessori Manual: In which Dr. Montessori's Teachings and Educational Occupations are Arranged in Practical Exercises Or Lessons for the Mother Or the Teacher

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W. E. Richardson Company, 1913 - Montessori method of education - 126 pages
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Page 28 - Not a mistake is made, not a glass is broken, not a drop of soup is spilled. All during the meal unobtrusive little waiters watch the table assiduously; not a child empties his soup-plate without being offered more; if he is ready for the next course a waiter briskly carries off his soupplate. Not a child is forced to ask for more soup, or to announce that he has finished. Remembering the usual condition of four-year-old children, who cry, who break whatever they touch, who need to be waited on,...
Page 19 - ... else. He must do it himself or it is never done. The learner must do his own learning, and this granted, it follows naturally that the less he is interfered with by arbitrary restraint and vexatious, unnecessary rules, the more quickly, easily and spontaneously he will learn.
Page 28 - Anyone who has watched them setting the table must have passed from one surprise to another. Little four-year-old waiters take the knives and forks and spoons and distribute them to the different places; they carry trays holding as many as five water glasses, and finally they go from table to table, carrying big tureens full of hot soup. Not a mistake is made, not a glass is broken, not a drop of soup is spilled. All during the meal unobtrusive little waiters watch the table assiduously; not a child...
Page 109 - Our children should understand that their duty is not to obey our personal wishes, because we happen to be their parents, but to obey eternal laws which we represent and expound and enforce. To take an instance, familiar to all of us, which comes into our everyday experience: Children should not, any more than they can help, be "messy...
Page 60 - Montessori at all times goes from the simple to the complex, from the concrete to the abstract. With this simple explanation I trust the mother will understand the significance of these exercises.
Page 43 - It is a set of ten rectangular wooden blocks decreasing in height and width, length only being constant. Its function is to-teach the dimension of thickness and it is another exercise for visual perception of differences of dimension. : THE LONG STAIR O "Long Stair" is a set of ten wooden square rods, which vary only in length.
Page 20 - The central idea of the Montessori system, on which every smallest bit of apparatus, every detail of technic rests solidly, is a full recognition of the fact that no human being can be educated by anyone else. He must do it himself or it is never done.
Page 95 - The children smile at each other, and begin to play again, perhaps a little more quietly than before, perhaps more gently, certainly with the shining eyes of devout believers who have blessedly lost themselves in an instant of rapt and self- forgetting devotion.
Page 32 - ... cylinder in the largest hole, he will find himself in the end with the largest cylinder for the smallest hole, etc.). These cylinder sets prepare for the more diCiult exercises that follow. "The Tower...
Page 31 - In the first series, diameter is constant, height varies; in the second series, diameter is constant, height varies; in the third series the cylindrical form alone is constant, height and diameter vary.

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