China’s Cosmopolitan Empire

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Harvard University Press, Jun 30, 2009 - History - 356 pages
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The Tang dynasty is often called China’s “golden age,” a period of commercial, religious, and cultural connections from Korea and Japan to the Persian Gulf, and a time of unsurpassed literary creativity. Mark Lewis captures a dynamic era in which the empire reached its greatest geographical extent under Chinese rule, painting and ceramic arts flourished, women played a major role both as rulers and in the economy, and China produced its finest lyric poets in Wang Wei, Li Bo, and Du Fu.

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User Review  - pbjwelch - LibraryThing

Best read, I think, after one has some knowledge of Chinese history as it covers themes and ideas that become much more engaging if one can fit them into the larger picture. Two points: The ... Read full review

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User Review  - thcson - LibraryThing

This is a well-written, concise introduction to the Tang dynasty. Its scope is quite broad, just like it was in the author's earlier book on the Qin and Han empires. The book resembles that earlier ... Read full review

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About the author (2009)

Mark Edward Lewis is Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in Chinese Culture at Stanford University.

Mark Edward Lewis is Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in Chinese Culture at Stanford University.

Timothy Brook is Professor of History and Republic of China Chair at the University of British Columbia.

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