Heidegger and Aristotle: The Twofoldness of Being

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SUNY Press, 2012 - Philosophy - 226 pages
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Walter A. Brogan’s long-awaited book exploring Heidegger’s phenomenological reading of Aristotle’s philosophy places particular emphasis on the Physics, Metaphysics, Ethics, and Rhetoric. Controversial and challenging, Heidegger and Aristotle claims that it is Heidegger’s sustained thematic focus and insight that governs his overall reading of Aristotle, namely, that Aristotle, while attempting to remain faithful to the Parmenidean dictum regarding the oneness and unity of being, nevertheless thinks of being as twofold. Brogan offers a careful and detailed analysis of several of the most important of Heidegger’s treatises on Aristotle, including his assertion that Aristotle’s twofoldness of being has been ignored or misread in the traditional substance-oriented readings of Aristotle. This groundbreaking study contributes immensely to the scholarship of a growing community of ancient Greek scholars engaged in phenomenological approaches to the reading and understanding of Aristotle.
 

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Contents

MARTIN HEIDEGGERS RELATIONSHIP TO ARISTOTLE
1
THE DOUBLING OF PHUSIS ARISTOTLES VIEW OF NATURE
21
THE DESTRUCTURING OF THE TRADITION
57
THE FORCE OF BEING
110
HEIDEGGER AND ARISTOTLE AN ONTOLOGY OF HUMAN DASEIN
138
CONCLUSION
188
NOTES
191
BIBLIOGRAPHY
203
INDEX
209
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Walter A. Brogan is Professor of Philosophy at Villanova University. He is the coeditor (with James Risser) of American Continental Philosophy: A Reader and the cotranslator (with Peter Warnek) of Martin Heidegger’s Aristotle’s Metaphysics (theta) 1–3: On the Essence and Actuality of Force.

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