Merry's Museum and Parley's Magazine, Volumes 33-34

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S.T. Allen & Company, 1857 - New York (N.Y.)
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Page 145 - The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne, Burn'd on the water: the poop was beaten gold ; Purple the sails, and so perfumed that The winds were love-sick with them : the oars were silver ; Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made The water, which they beat, to follow faster, As amorous of their strokes.
Page 158 - God is our refuge and strength, A very present help in trouble. Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, And though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea; Though the waters thereof roar and be troubled, Though the mountains shake with the swelling thereof.
Page 106 - Oh ! ever thus, from childhood's hour, I've seen my fondest hopes decay ; I never loved a tree or flower, But 'twas the first to fade away. I never nursed a dear gazelle, To glad me with its soft black eye, • But when it came to know me well, And love me, it was sure to die...
Page 145 - Purple the sails, and so perfumed that The winds were love-sick with them; the oars were [silver, Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke, and made The water which they beat to follow faster, As amorous of their strokes. For her own person, It...
Page 145 - O'er-picturing that Venus where we see The fancy outwork nature: on each side her Stood pretty dimpled boys, like smiling Cupids, With divers-colour'd fans, whose wind did seem To glow the delicate cheeks which they did cool, And what they undid did . . . Her gentlewomen, like the Nereides, So many mermaids, tended her i...
Page 55 - Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray the Lord my soul to keep ; If I should die before I wake, I pray the Lord my soul to take ; And this I ask for Jesus
Page 179 - Therefore be sure you look to that. And, in the next place, look to your health: and if you have it, praise God, and value it next to a good conscience; for health is the second blessing that we mortals are capable of; a blessing that money cannot buy; and therefore value it, and be thankful for it.
Page 172 - Seemed better than in song or story; If men instead of nursing pride Would learn to hate it and abhor it, If more relied On Love to guide, The world would be the better for it If men dealt less in stocks and lands, And more in bonds and deeds fraternal, If Love's work had more willing hands To link this world with the supernal; If men stored up Love's oil and wine And on bruised human hearts would pour it, If " yours " and " mine " Would once combine, The world would be the better for it.
Page 67 - O YE, whose cheek the tear of pity stains, Draw near with pious rev'rence, and attend ! Here lie the loving husband's dear remains, The tender father, and the gen'rous friend. The pitying heart that felt for human woe ; The dauntless heart that fear'd no human pride ; The friend of man, to vice alone a foe ; " For ev'n his failings lean'd to virtue's side.
Page 107 - God so loved the world, that he sent his only begotten son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish but have everlasting life.

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