The Land of the Dollar

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Dodd, Mead, 1898 - United States - 316 pages
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Page 145 - You might be on a central peak of the high Alps. All about you they rise, the mountains of building — not in the broken line of New York, but thick together, side by side, one behind the other. From this height the flat roofs of the ordinary buildings of four or five stories are not distinguishable from the ground ; planting their feet on these rise the serried ranks of the heaven-scaling peaks. You are almost surprised to see no snow on them : the steam that gushes perpetually from their chimneys,...
Page 307 - Representatives, pocket Senators. In the name of individual freedom and industrial progress they have become the tyrants of the whole community. Lawless greed on one side, and lawless brutality on the other — the outlook frowns. On the wisdom of the rulers of the country in salving or embittering these antagonisms — still more, on the fortune of the people in either modifying or hardening their present conviction that to get dollars is the one end of life — it depends whether the future of...
Page 92 - But when you reach Washington you forget every-thing in delight at the charm of the place. There is an impression of comfort, of leisure, of space to spare, of stateliness that you hardly expected in America. It looks a sort of place where nobody has to work for his living, or, at any rate, not hard.
Page 310 - ... are the most demonstrative of all the peoples of the earth. Everything must be brought to the surface, embodied in a visible, palpable form. For a fact to make any effect on the American mind it must be put in a shape where it can be seen, heard, handled. If you want to impress your fellows you must do it not through their reasoning powers, but through the five senses of their bodies. "' I noticed it first in connection with their way of conducting an election. A hundred thousand men are going...
Page 82 - A compact, black-coated figure, a clean-shaven, clear-cut face, a large, sharp nose, and a square mouth and jaw. With the faint blue stubble on his face, and his long grizzly hair, he suggests an actor to the English mind.
Page 151 - Chicago is to be told that you ought to have taken better care of yourself. You were unfit; you did not survive. There is no more to be said about it. The truth is that nobody in this rushing, struggling tumult has any time to look after what we have long ago come to think the bare decencies of civilisa-tion. This man is in a hurry to work up his tallow, that man to ship his grain. Everybody is fighting to be rich, is then straining to be refined, and nobody can attend to making the city fit to live...
Page 149 - Chicago is conscious that there is something in the world, some sense of form, of elegance, of refinement, that with all her corn and railways, her hogs and by-products and dollars, she lacks.
Page 129 - ... not. He also was not unmindful of the spittoon. Yet with that he is gifted with a kindly courtesy that is plainly genuine and completely winning. I am no more pre-judiced in favour of the apostle of Protection than any other Englishman; yet it was impossible not to feel—absurd as it seemed—that he was really glad to see a wandering newspaper correspondent from the country against which his whole policy has for years been directed. Not to be tedious, his personality pre-sents a rare combination...
Page 10 - Never have I seen a city more hideous or more splendid. Uncouth, formless, piebald, chaotic, it yet stamps itself upon you as the most magnificent embodiment of Titanic energy and force. . . . The very buildings cry aloud of struggling, almost savage, unregulated strength. It is the outward expression of the freest, fiercest individualism." How true that is! Although "the eye of little employment hath the daintier sense...
Page 144 - East; widely and generously planned with streets of twenty miles, where it is not safe to walk at night; where women ride straddlewise, and millionaires dine at mid-day on the Sabbath ; the chosen seat of public spirit and municipal boodle, of cut-throat commerce and munificent patronage of art ; the most American of American cities, and yet the most mongrel ; the second American city of the globe, the fifth German city, the third Swedish, the second Polish, the first and only veritable Babel of...

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