Transitional Justice in Post-Communist Romania: The Politics of Memory

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Cambridge University Press, Dec 17, 2012 - Law
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A close examination of an understudied European Union member state such as Romania reveals that, since 1989, post-Communist state and non-state actors have adopted a wide range of methods, processes and practices of working through the Communist past. Both the timing and the sequencing of these transitional justice methods prove to be significant in determining the efficacy of addressing and redressing the crimes of 1945 to 1989. In addition, there is evidence that some of these methods have directly facilitated the democratization process, while the absence of other methods has undermined the rule of law. This is the first volume to overview the complex Romanian transitional justice effort by accessing secret archives and investigating court trials of former Communist perpetrators, lustration, compensation and rehabilitation, property restitution, the truth commission, the rewriting of history books, and unofficial truth projects.
 

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Contents

Memory Democracy and Iustice in PostCommunism
1
Court Trials
41
Public Access to Secret Files
58
Lustration
92
The Commission and Official Condemnation
111
Restitution of Property
159
Compensation and Rehabilitation
161
Rewriting History Textbooks
187
Unofficial Projects
205
Memory Timing and Democracy
233
Bibliography
255
Index
283
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About the author (2012)

Lavinia Stan is an Associate Professor of Political Science at St Francis Xavier University, Canada. She is regional editor for Europe for the peer-reviewed Women's Studies International Forum and a member of the Scientific Council of the Institute for the Investigation of Communist Crimes and the Memory of Romanian Exile, the Social Science Adjudicating Commission of the Romanian Ministry of Education and the editorial boards of eleven scholarly journals in North America and Europe. Her books include Church, State, and Democracy in Expanding Europe and Religion and Politics in Post-Communist Romania (both co-authored with Lucian Turcescu), Transitional Justice in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union: Reckoning with the Communist Past, 1989009: Incredibila aventura a democratiei dupa comunism (co-edited with Lucian Turcescu), Leaders and Laggards: Governance, Civicness and Ethnicity in Post-Communist Romania, Romania in Transition and the Encyclopedia of Transitional Justice (co-edited with Nadya Nedelsky).

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