The Hobbit, Or, There and Back Again

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Houghton Mifflin Company, 1997 - Juvenile Fiction - 271 pages
2693 Reviews
J.R.R. Tolkien's classic prelude to his Lord of the Rings trilogy
Bilbo Baggins is a hobbit who enjoys a comfortable, unambitious life, rarely traveling any farther than his pantry or cellar. But his contentment is disturbed when the wizard Gandalf and a company of dwarves arrive on his doorstep one day to whisk him away on an adventure. They have launched a plot to raid the treasure hoard guarded by Smaug the Magnificent, a large and very dangerous dragon. Bilbo reluctantly joins their quest, unaware that on his journey to the Lonely Mountain he will encounter both a magic ring and a frightening creature known as Gollum.
Written for J.R.R. Tolkien's own children, The Hobbit has sold many millions of copies worldwide and established itself as a modern classic.

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User Review  - SESchend - LibraryThing

Very very good adaptation of Tolkien's HOBBIT I finally took down from the shelves after 11 years. I wanted to reread the actual novel but didn't have time, so this was my fall-back. Good storytelling with great art by David Wenzel. Read full review

Review: The Hobbit (Middle-Earth Universe)

User Review  - Clare Walker - Goodreads

So glad to be done with this. I can appreciate it's good and everything, but Fantasy books are just not for me. I was barely taking it in towards the end. Been trying to read this for about ten years, and it was worth it. It's cute. But no Lord of the Rings for me! Read full review

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About the author (1997)

J.R.R. Tolkien (1892–1973), beloved throughout the world as the creator of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, was a professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford, a fellow of Pembroke College, and a fellow of Merton College until his retirement in 1959. His chief interest was the linguistic aspects of the early English written tradition, but even as he studied these classics he was creating a set of his own.

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