Pragmatism

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Harvard University Press, 1975 - Philosophy - 316 pages
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"It is absolutely the only philosophy with no humbug in it," an exhilarated William James wrote to a friend early in 1907. And later that year, after finishing the proofs of his "little book," he wrote to his brother Henry: "I shouldn't be surprised if ten years hence it should be rated as 'epoch-making,' for of the definitive triumph of that general way of thinking I can entertain no doubt whatever—I believe it to be something quite like the protestant reformation."

Both the acclaim and outcry that greeted Pragmatism: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking helped to affirm James's conviction. For it was in Pragmatism that he confronted older philosophic methods with the "pragmatic" method, demanding that ideas be tested by their relation to life and their effects in experience. James's reasoning and conclusions in Pragmatism have exerted a profound influence on philosophy in this century, and the book remains a landmark.

 

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Contents

Pragmatism I
27
A Note on the Editorial Method
177
The Text of Pragmatism
185
Apparatus
203
Emendations
205
Textual Notes
213
Alterations in the Manuscripts
229
WordDivision
252
Report of the Wellesley Lectures 1905
275
Key to the Pagination of Editions
315
Copyright

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About the author (1975)

William James was the son of the philosopher Henry James and brother of the novelist Henry James.

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