Great Speeches

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1991 - Literary Collections - 113 pages
6 Reviews
For someone who claimed he had been educated by "littles" — a little now and a little then — Abraham Lincoln displayed a remarkable facility in his use of the written word. The simple yet memorable eloquence of his speeches, proclamations and personal correspondence is recorded here in a representative collection of 16 documents.
This volume contains, complete and unabridged, the Address Before the Young Men's Lyceum of Springfield, Illinois (1838), which emphasized a theme Lincoln was to return to repeatedly, namely, the capacity of a people to govern themselves; the "House Divided" speech at the Republican State Convention in Illinois (1858); the First Inaugural Address (1861), in which he appealed to the people of an already divided union for sectional harmony; the Gettysburg Address (1863), a speech delivered at ceremonies dedicating a part of the Gettysburg battlefield as a cemetery; the Letter to Mrs. Bixby (1864), expressing Lincoln's regrets over the wartime deaths of her five sons; the Second Inaugural Address (March 1865), urging a post-war nation to "bind up its wounds" and show "charity for all"; and his Last Public Address (April 11, 1865). New notes place the speeches and other documents in their respective historical contexts.
An invaluable reference for history students, this important volume will also fascinate admirers of Abraham Lincoln, Americana enthusiasts, Civil War buffs and any lover of the finely crafted phrase. Includes 2 selections from the Common Core State Standards Initiative: "Gettysburg Address" and "Second Inaugural Address."
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MartinBodek - LibraryThing

If I want to learn the write like a master, then I must read the master. Simply reviewing this valuable compendium is en education in itself. I now understand how and where he uses old English words ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - empress8411 - LibraryThing

This is a fine collection of Lincoln's speeches, spanning his time in Illinois politics and in Washington. Appelbaum did a good drop arranging and collecting these words. As for the speeches, they are ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Address Before the Young Mens Lyceum of Springfield Illinois January 27 1838
1
Speech in the United States House of Representatives July 27 1848
9
Speech Delivered at Springfield Illinois at the Close of the Republican State Convention June 16 1858
24
Last Speech in Springfield Illinois in the 1858 Campaign October 30 1858
33
Address at Cooper Institute New York February 27 1860
35
Farewell Address at Springfield Illinois February 11 1861
52
First Inaugural Address March 4 1861
53
Message to Congress in Special Session July 4 1861
62
Annual Message to Congress December 1 1862
78
Final Emancipation Proclamation January 1 1863
98
Proclamation for Thanksgiving October 3 1863
101
Address Delivered at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg November 19 1863
103
Letter to Mrs Bixby November 21 1864
105
Second Inaugural Address March 4 1865
106
Last Public Address April 11 1865
109
Copyright

Proclamation of a National FastDay August 12 1861
76

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About the author (1991)

Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 - April 15, 1865) was the 16th president of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through its Civil War, its bloodiest war and its greatest moral, constitutional and political crisis. In doing so, he preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the economy. Lincoln was a self-educated lawyer in Illinois, a Whig Party leader and a state legislator in the 1830s. After a series of highly publicized debates in 1858, during which Lincoln spoke out against the expansion of slavery, he lost the U.S. Senate race to his archrival, Democrat Stephen A. Douglas. In 1860, Lincoln secured a Republican Party presidential nomination. His presidential election resulted in seven southern slave states to form the Confederacy before he took the office on March 4, 1861. Lincoln is regarded by historians as one of the greatest United States presidents. During his term, he created the system of national banks with the National Banking Act. This provided a strong financial network in the country. It also established a national currency. In 1862, Congress created, with Lincoln's approval, the Department of Agriculture. Lincoln was able to appoint five Supreme Court justices during his time as president. He is largely responsible for instituting the Thanksgiving holiday in the US. Lincoln's Gettysburg Address of 1863 became an iconic statement of America's dedication to the principles of nationalism, republicanism, equal rights, liberty, and democracy. Lincoln held a moderate view of Reconstruction. On April 15, 1865, six days after the surrender of Confederate commanding General Robert E. Lee, Lincoln was assassinated at the Ford Theater by John Wilkes Booth, a noted actor and Confederate spy from Maryland. Lincoln was married to Mary Todd Lincoln on November 4, 1842. They had four children, all boys. Only the oldest, Robert, survived to adulthood. After Lincoln's death, Robert committed his mother, Mary, for a short time. The death of their children had a profound effect on the mental health of both Lincoln and his wife.

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