Select Prose Works, Volume 2

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Hatchard, 1836 - 2 pages
 

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Page 46 - Thammuz came next behind, Whose annual wound in Lebanon allured The Syrian damsels to lament his fate In amorous ditties, all a summer's day; While smooth Adonis from his native rock Ran purple to the sea, supposed with blood Of Thammuz yearly wounded...
Page 345 - But ye shall not be so : but he that is greatest among you, let him be as the younger ; and he that is chief, as he that doth serve.
Page 302 - So ye shall not pollute the land wherein ye are; for blood it defileth the land: and the land cannot be cleansed of the blood that is shed therein, but by the blood of him that shed it.
Page 362 - To make the people fittest to choose, and the chosen fittest to govern, will be to mend our corrupt and faulty education, to teach the people faith, not without virtue, temperance, modesty, sobriety, parsimony, justice; not to admire wealth or honour; to hate turbulence and ambition; to place every one his private welfare and happiness in the public peace, liberty, and safety.
Page 380 - What I have spoken is the language of that which is not called amiss ; "The Good old Cause"; if it seem strange to any, it will not seem more strange, I hope, than convincing to backsliders. Thus much I should perhaps have said, though I were sure I should have spoken only to trees and stones; and had none to cry to but with the prophet
Page 265 - Behold, thou hast driven me out this day from the face of the earth; and from thy face shall I be hid; and I shall be a fugitive and a vagabond in the earth; and it shall come to pass, that every one that findeth me shall slay me.
Page 375 - The other part of our freedom consists in the civil rights and advancements of every person according to his merit: the enjoyment of those never more certain, and the access to these never more open, than in a free commonwealth.
Page 8 - There was a philosopher that disputed with Adrian the emperor, and did it but weakly. One of his friends that stood by, afterwards said unto him : methinks you were not like yourself last day, in argument with the emperor , I could have answered better myself.
Page 265 - For ye know how that afterward, when he would have inherited the blessing, he was rejected : for he found no place of repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears.
Page 259 - Ye have taken away my gods which I made, and the priest, and ye are gone away ; and what have I more...

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