Black France: Colonialism, Immigration, and Transnationalism

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Indiana University Press, 2007 - History - 305 pages
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"[W]ithout a doubt one of the most important studies so far completed on literature in French grounded in the experiences of migrants of sub-Saharan African origin." —Alec Hargreaves, Florida State University

France has always hosted a rich and vibrant black presence within its borders. But recent violent events have raised questions about France's treatment of ethnic minorities. Challenging the identity politics that have set immigrants against the mainstream, Black France explores how black expressive culture has been reformulated as global culture in the multicultural and multinational spaces of France. Thomas brings forward questions such as—Why is France a privileged site of civilization? Who is French? Who is an immigrant? Who controls the networks of production? Black France poses an urgently needed reassessment of the French colonial legacy.

 

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Contents

Black France in Transcolonial Contexts
1
2 Francocentrism and the Acquisition of Cultural Capital
41
3 Textual Ownership and the Global Mediation of Blackness
82
4 Rhetorical Mediations of Slavery
114
5 AfroParisianism and African Feminisms
131
La sape and Vestimentary Codes in Transnational Contexts and Urban Diasporas
155
7 African Youth in the Global Economy
185
Conclusion
206
Notes
213
Bibliography
261
Index
293
Back cover
309
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About the author (2007)

Dominic Thomas is Professor of Comparative Literature and Chair of the Department of French and Francophone Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is author of Nation-Building, Propaganda, and Literature in Francophone Africa (IUP, 2002).

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