Ancient Times: A History of the Early World

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Ginn, 1916 - Egypt - 742 pages
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Contents

THE HEIRS OF ALEXANDER 66 The Heirs of Alexanders Empire
66
The Decline of Greece
67
Art and Architecture in the Pyramid
68
The Western Mediterranean World
72
Earliest Rome
73
THE FEUDAL AGE AND THE EMPIRE 8 The Nile Voyage and the Feudal
74
The Expansion of the Roman Republic and the Con quest of Italy
75
Italy under the Early Roman Republic
76
Rome and Carthage as Commercial Rivals PAGE
77
The Founding of the Empire
80
The Higher Life of the Empire
86
The Decline and Fall of the Egyptian Empire
93
The Decipherment of Egyptian Writing by Champollion
97
The Lands and Races of Western Asia
100
Rise of Sumerian Civilization and Early Struggle of Sumerian and Semite
107
the Age of Sargon
122
the Kings of Sumer and Akkad
126
the Age of Hammurapi and After
128
THE ASSYRIANS AND CHALDEANS 18 Early Assyria and her Rivals
140
The Assyrian Empire about 750 to 612 B C
151
the Last Semitic Empire
164
CHAPTER PAGE VI THE MEDOPERSIAN EMPIRE 21 The IndoEuropean Peoples and their Dispersion
171
The Aryan Peoples and the Iranian Prophet Zoroaster
176
Cyrus
179
The Civilization of the Persian Empire about 530
182
PAGE
182
I
182
Persian Documents and the Decipherment of Cuneiform
189
5
191
The Results of Persian Rule and its Rcligious Influence
194
THE HEBREWS AND THE DECLINE OF THE ORIENT 27 Palestine and the Predecessors of the Hebrews there
197
The Settlement of the Hebrews in Palestine and the United Hebrew Kingdom
200
The Two Hebrew Kingdoms
206
The Destruction of the Hebrew Kingdoms by Assyria and Chaldea
210
The Hebrews in Exile and their Deliverance by the Persians
213
9
215
Decline of Oriental Leadership Estimate of Oriental Civilization
217
THE GREEKS VIII THE DAWN OF EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION AND THE RISE OF THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN WORLD 33 The Daw...
221
14
222

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Page 79 - Oryx nome, as far as its southern and northern boundary, preserving its people alive and furnishing its food, so that there was none hungry therein. I gave to the widow as (to) her who had a husband; I did not exalt the great above the small in all that I gave. Then came great Niles, possessors of grain and all things, (but) I did not collect the arrears of the field.
Page 665 - This people has already made its way into every city, and it is not easy to find any place in the habitable world which has not received this nation and in which it has not made its power felt
Page 217 - By the rivers of Babylon There we sat down, yea, we wept, When we remembered Zion. Upon the willows in the midst thereof We hanged up our harps. For there they that led us captive required of us songs, And they that wasted us required of us mirth : ' Sing us one of the songs of Zion.
Page 257 - Driving their herds before them, with their families in rough carts drawn by horses, the rude Greek tribesmen must have looked out upon the fair pastures of Thessaly, the snowy summit of Olympus, and the blue waters of the jEgean not long after 2000 B.
Page 685 - Even the citizen's wages and the prices of the goods he bought or sold were as far as possible fixed for him by the State. The emperor's innumerable officials kept an eye upon even the humblest citizen. They watched the grain dealers, butchers, and bakers, and saw to it that they properly supplied the public and never deserted their occupation. In some cases the State even forced the son to follow the profession of his father.
Page 49 - The invention of writing and of a convenient system of records on paper has had a greater influence in uplifting the human race than any other intellectual achievement in the career of man. It was more important than all the battles ever fought...
Page 133 - The secretary draws a reed stylus from a leather holder at his girdle, and quickly covers the small clay tablet with its lines of wedge groups. The writer then sprinkles over the soft wet tablet a handful of dry powdered clay. This is to prevent the clay envelope, which he now deftly wraps about the letter, from adhering to the written surface. On this soft clay envelope he writes the address and sends the letter out to be put into the furnace and baked.
Page 227 - Europe or neighboring Asia. Thus at the dawn of history, barbarian Europe looked across the Mediterranean to the great civilization of the Nile, as our own North American Indians fixed their wondering eyes on the first Europeans who landed in America, and listened to like strange tales of great and distant peoples.
Page 164 - Nineveh he planted strange trees and plants from all quarters of his great empire. Among them were cotton trees, of which he says, " The trees that bore wool they clipped and they carded it for garments." These cotton trees came from India. We thus see appearing for the first time in the ancient world the cotton which now furnishes so large a part of our own national wealth.
Page 636 - They altered the narrow city-\aw of Rome so that it might meet the needs of the whole Empire. In spirit these laws were fair, just, and humane, and did much to unify the peoples of the Mediterranean world into a single nation: for...

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