The Lives of John Selden, Esq., and Archbishop Usher: With Notices of the Principal English Men of Letters with Whom They Were Connected

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Mathews and Leigh, 1812 - Great Britain - 430 pages
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Page 110 - Parliament, the chief of learned men reputed in this land, Mr. Selden, whose volume of natural and national laws proves, not only by great authorities brought together, but by exquisite reasons and theorems almost mathematically demonstrative, that all opinions, yea, errors, known, read, and collated, arc of main service and assistance toward the speedy attainment of what is truest.
Page 190 - London ; and he was very much troubled always when he heard him blamed, censured, and reproached, for staying in London, and in the parliament, after they were in rebellion, and in the worst times, which his age obliged him to do ; and how wicked soever the actions were which were every day done, he was confident he had not given his consent to them ; but would have hindered them if he could with his own safety, to which he was always enough indulgent. If he had some infirmities with other men, they...
Page 38 - That the liberties, franchises, privileges and jurisdictions of Parliament are the ancient and undoubted birthright and inheritance of the subjects of England...
Page 110 - Peter, kill and eat, leaving the choice to each man's discretion. Wholesome meats, to a vitiated stomach, differ little or nothing .from unwholesome; and best books to a naughty mind are not unappliable to occasions of evil. Bad meats will scarce breed good nourishment in the healthiest concoction; but herein the difference is of bad books, that they to a discreet and judicious reader serve in many respects to discover, to confute, to forewarn, and to illustrate.
Page 25 - They were directed to make inquiry, not only by the legal methods of juries and witnesses, but by all other means and ways which they could devise; that is, by the rack, by torture, by inquisition, by imprisonment Where they found reason to suspect any person, they might administer to him an oath, called "ex officio...
Page 181 - In all times the Princes in England have done something illegal to get Money: but then came a Parliament and all was well; the People and the Prince kissed and were Friends, and so things were quiet for a while. Afterwards there was another Trick found out to get Money, and after they had got it, another Parliament was called to set all right, &c. But now they have so out-run the Constable...
Page 189 - ... his humanity, courtesy, and affability was such, that he would have been thought to have been bred in the best courts, but that his good nature, charity, and delight in doing good, and in communicating all he knew, exceeded that breeding.
Page 182 - No man is the wiser for his learning : it may administer matter to work in or objects to work upon ; but wit and wisdom are born with a man.
Page 187 - Thongh some make slight of Libels, yet you may see by them how the wind sits : As, take a straw and throw it up into the air, you may see by that which way the wind is, which you shall not do by casting up a stone. More solid things do not show the complexion of the times so well as Ballads and Libels.
Page 171 - arcanum" of pretending religion in all wars, is, that something may be found out in which all men may have interest. In this the groom has as much interest as the lord. Were it for land, one has one thousand acres, and the other but one : he would not venture so far as he that has a thousand. But religion is equal to both. Had all men land alike, by a " lex agraria," then all men would say they fought for land.

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