The Horticulturist, and Journal of Rural Art and Rural Taste, Volume 21

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Luther Tucker, 1866 - Gardening
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Page 280 - of the hail, nor the drift of the whirlwind, that the highest characters of the sublime are developed. God is not in the earthquake, nor in the fire, but in the still small voice. They are but the blunt and the low faculties of his nature, which can only be addressed through lampblack and lightning. It
Page 279 - It is fitted in all its functions for the perpetual comfort and exalting of the heart— for soothing it and purifying it of its dross and dust. Sometimes gentle, sometimes capricious, sometimes awful, never the same for two moments together, almost human in its passions, almost spiritual in its tenderness, almost divine in its
Page 280 - subdued passages of unobtrusive majesty, the deep, and the calm, and the' perpetual ; that which must be sought ere it can be seen, and loved ere it is understood things which the angels work out for us daily, and yet vary eternally, which are never wanting, and
Page 279 - its dross and dust. Sometimes gentle, sometimes capricious, sometimes awful, never the same for two moments together, almost human in its passions, almost spiritual in its tenderness, almost divine in its affinity; its appeal to what is immortal in us is
Page 211 - Quincunxes in Heaven above; quincunxes in earth below; quincunxes in the mind of man ; quincunxes in tones, in optic nerves, in roots of trees, in leaves, in everything." The quinary theory of created things, as propounded by some few modern naturalists, would have been a
Page 28 - moderate conveniences joined to them, and there dedicate the remainder of my life only to the culture of them and the study of nature. And there, with no design beyond my wall Whole and entire to lye, In no inactive ease and no unglorious poverty." Cowley's wish is, like Pope's Universal Prayer, adapted to all sorts and conditions of men. How many
Page 181 - possess. They will send the painter more than ever to the study of nature, and perhaps they will have a still more beneficial effect on the art by sending the critic of painting to the same school.
Page 64 - bushes and wilful shrubs. The shade upon the earth is black as night. High, high above your head, and on every side all down to the ground, the thicket is hemmed in and choked up by the interlacing boughs that droop with the weight of roses, and load the slow air
Page 28 - I NEVER had any other desire so strong and so like to covetousness, as that one which I have had always,—that I might be master, at least of a small house and large garden, with
Page 212 - and the shadow of the earth, the noblest part of the creation had remained unseen, and the stars in Heaven as invisible as on the fourth day, when they were created above the horizon with the sun, or there was not an eye to behold them. The greatest mystery of religion is expressed by adumbration ; and in the noblest part of Jewish types we

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