Object-Oriented Behavioral Specifications

Front Cover
Haim Kilov, William Harvey
Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 30, 1996 - Computers - 316 pages
Object-Oriented Behavioral Specifications encourages builders of complex information systems to accelerate their move to using the approach of a scientific discipline in analysis rather than the approach of a craft. The focus is on understanding customers' needs and on precise specification of understanding gained through analysis. Specifications must bridge any gaps in understanding about business rules among customers, Subject Matter Experts, and `computer people', must inform decisions about reuse of software and systems, and must enable review of semantics over time. Specifications need to describe semantics rather than syntax, and to do that in an abstract and precise manner, in order to create software systems that satisfy business rules.
The papers in this book show various ways of designing elegant and clear specifications which are reusable, lead to savings of intellectual effort, time, and money, and which contribute to the reliability of software and systems.
Object-Oriented Behavioral Specifications offers a fresh treatment of the object-oriented paradigm by examining the limitations of traditional OO methodologies and by describing the significance of competing trends in OO modeling. The book builds on four years of successful OOPSLA workshops (1991-1995) on behavior semantics.
This book deals with precise specifications of `what' is accomplished by the business and `what' is to be done by a system. The book includes descriptions of successful use of abstract and precise specification in industry. It draws on the experience of experts from industrial and academic settings and benefits from international participation. Collective behavior, neglected in some treatment of the OO paradigm, is addressed explicitly in this book. The book does not take `reuse' of specifications or software for granted, but furnishes a foundation for taking as rigorous an approach to reuse decisions as to precise specifications in original developments.
 

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Contents

Exactness and clarity in a componentbased specification language
1
Information refraction
31
A pragmatic approach to formal specification
41
Anecdotes on making a specification simpler
63
Invariants in the trenches
77
Fundamentals of objectoriented specification and modeling
101
behavioral specifications for
121
Structural activeobject systems fundamentals
143
an objectoriented framework
163
Dynamic and multiple classification
193
Modeling and structuring behavior
223
behavioral modeling versus
241
Automata describing object behavior
265
Enterprise modeling with use cases
287
l
311
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About the author (1996)

Born in Folkestone, Kent, England, Harvey was a British physiologist whose discovery of the circulation of the blood drastically changed medicine. In fact, Harvey is generally regarded as the founder of modern physiology. The publication of his Exercitatio Anatomica de Motu Cordis et Sanguinis in Animalibus (1628) was a landmark event, widely considered the most important medical book ever published. His observations of the heart's functions and blood flow were based on anatomical studies on cadavers, animals, and himself. The son of a wealthy businessman, Harvey was a student at Cambridge University, where he studied medicine. He completed his medical training at the leading European medical school of the period, Padua, where he was a student of the famous anatomist Girolamo Fabricius. When he completed his doctorate in medicine in 1602 he returned to London and was appointed physician to St. Bartholomew's Hospital. His reputation grew, and he was elected to the Royal College of Physicians, with which he was associated for the rest of his career. Ten years prior to the publication of his great work, he was appointed as a physician to James I. After the Scottish civil war and the demise of James I, Harvey returned to London and resumed his medical practice. He continued to observe animal life wherever he traveled and wrote two additional works on animal locomotion and comparative and pathological anatomy. However, it was the publication of his book on the circulation of the blood that assured him "a place of first importance in the history of science and medicine. By this discovery he revolutionized physiological thought" (Dictionary of Scientific Biography). His work also encouraged others to study anatomy. Harvey's personal library, which he donated to the London College of Physicians, was unfortunately destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666.