Plant Inventory -, Issues 41-50

Front Cover
The Department, 1917 - Germplasm resources, Plant
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 9 - Meyer, an agricultural explorer of the Office of Foreign Seed and Plant Introduction of the United States Department of Agriculture.
Page 67 - But they do produce by two to three or four times more per man, per unit of labor and capital, than the farmers of any European country. They are more alert and use more labor-saving devices than any other farmers in the world. And their response to the demands of the present emergency has been in every way remarkable. Last spring their planting exceeded by 12,000,000 acres the largest planting of any previous year, and ' the yields from the crops were record-breaking yields. In the fall of 1917...
Page 50 - The crows ((jorvus kubaryi) are very fond of them, and the natives eat them as delicacies either fresh or candied. The bark and leaves are astringent and contain tannin. In India they are mixed with iron salts to form a black pigment, with which the natives in certain localities color their teeth and make ink. This species is an excellent shade tree. It is of wide tropical distribution and is often planted for ornament and for the sake of its nuts. It has been introduced into Hawaii and the natives...
Page 79 - in strength it is only inferior to Sal, while in many other useful qualities it surpasses 'it, and has the advantage of being lighter. For felloes and naves of wheels and ' carved work of every description, for framings of carriages and similar work, it is 'unsurpassed by any other...
Page 137 - This beautiful and superb grass is highly celebrated in the Puranas, the Indian God of War having been born in a grove of it, which burst into a flame...
Page 80 - The tree thrives in the moist low country up to 1,600 feet and requires rich and well-drained soil. It does not seem to flourish near the sea, and is rarely met with about Colombo. It produces seed very scantily anywhere, a pod or two occasionally being all that can be obtained, and even these are often infertile. Propagation by layering has therefore to be adopted. Introduced into Ceylon in 1860.
Page 109 - In an unripe state the fruit contains a sticky white latex, but when fully matured the white, transparent, jellylike substance surrounding the seed is sweet and agreeable. The fruit when cut across presents a stellate form, the cells with their white edible contents radiating from the central axis; hence the name star-apple.
Page 61 - These bacteria almost invariably inhabit the micropyle of the young seed, and, when the latter germinates, grow through certain stomata of the young leaves and into the intra-cellular spaces formed in the leaf-tissues around these stomata. Cavities are formed through the growth of the epidermal cells which later close entirely and make bacterial nodules which are deeply imbedded in the leaf tissues. A single leaf may have several dozen of these symbiotic bacterial nodules. Faber was able, by treating...
Page 44 - The large, oblong, green or greenish-yellow fruit is not unlike a water melon, and contains 262 263 in its hollow centre a mass of purplish sweet-acid, edible pulp, mixed with the flat seeds. In the unripe state the succulent shell may be boiled and used as a vegetable. The root is usually swollen and fleshy, and is sometimes cooked and eaten like a yam. The flowers are generally pollinated by insects, but these should be aided by artificial pollination in order to ensure a good crop of fruit. When...
Page 84 - ... him. At about the same time it was named in England Rosa bakeri and R. kelleri, names which can not be used for it, however, as they had previously been given to other roses. It is one of the Multiflora roses with long stems which lie flat on the ground, lustrous foliage, and pure white flowers 2 inches or more In diameter, In wide many-flowered clusters. The flowers are larger than those of the Japanese R. multiflora, and It blooms much later than that species. This rose is perfectly hardy and...

Bibliographic information