Times Telescope

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Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, 1826 - Almanacs, English
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Page cx - ALL worldly shapes shall melt in gloom, The Sun himself must die, Before this mortal shall assume Its Immortality ! I saw a vision in my sleep, That gave my spirit strength to sweep Adown the gulf of Time ; I saw the last of human mould, That shall Creation's death behold, As Adam saw her prime. The Sun's eye had a sickly glare, The Earth with age was wan, The skeletons of nations were Around that lonely man...
Page 71 - Ave Maria ! blessed be the hour ! The time, the clime, the spot, where I so oft Have felt that moment in its fullest power Sink o'er the earth so beautiful and soft, While swung the deep bell in the distant tower. Or the faint dying day-hymn stole aloft, And not a breath crept through the rosy air, And yet the forest leaves seem'd stirr'd with prayer.
Page cxi - The eclipse of Nature spreads my pall, The majesty of Darkness shall Receive my parting ghost! "This spirit shall return to Him Who gave its heavenly spark: Yet think not, Sun, it shall be dim When thou thyself art dark ! No! it shall live again, and shine In bliss unknown to beams of thine; By Him recalled to breath, Who captive led captivity, ' Who robbed the grave of victory, And took the sting from Death...
Page xc - There wanted yet the master-work, the end Of all yet done ; a creature, who not prone And brute as other creatures, but endued With sanctity of reason, might erect His stature, and upright with front serene Govern the rest, self-knowing ; and from thence Magnanimous to correspond with heaven...
Page 220 - We stayed till, it being darkish, we saw the fire as only one entire arch of fire from this to the other side the bridge, and in a bow up the hill for an arch of above a mile long ; it made me weep to see it. The churches, houses, and all on fire, and flaming at once ; and a horrid noise the flames made, and the cracking of houses at their ruin.
Page 217 - Some of our maids sitting up late last night to get things ready against our feast to-day, Jane called us up about three in the morning, to tell us of a great fire they saw in the City.
Page cx - Go, let oblivion's curtain fall Upon the stage of men. Nor with thy rising beams recall Life's tragedy again: Its piteous pageants bring not back, Nor waken flesh, upon the rack Of pain anew to writhe; Stretched in disease's shapes abhorred, Or mown in battle by the sword, Like grass beneath the scythe.
Page 218 - Having staid, and in an hour's time seen the fire rage every way, and nobody, to my sight, endeavouring to quench it, but to remove their goods, and leave all to the fire, and having seen it get as far as the Steele-yard, and the wind mighty high and driving it into the City; and every thing, after so long a drought, proving combustible, even the very stones of churches, and among other things the poor steeple by which pretty Mrs.
Page 218 - Marke-lane at the farthest; but, being unused to such fires as followed, I thought it far enough off; and so went to bed again, and to sleep. About seven rose again...
Page 40 - I find that Mrs Pierce's little girl is my valentine, she having drawn me : which I was not sorry for, it easing me of something more that I must have given to others. But here I do first observe the fashion of drawing...

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