History of New York Ship Yards

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Press of W.F. Sametz & Company, 1909 - Shipbuilding - 165 pages
 

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Page 28 - York, the project was viewed by the public either with indifference or with contempt, as a visionary scheme. My friends, indeed, were civil, but they were shy. They listened with patience to my explanations, but with a settled cast of incredulity on their countenances. I felt the force of the lamentation of the poet, Truths would you teach to save a sinking land, All shun, none aid you ; and few understand.
Page 28 - ... partners of my mortification, and not of my triumph. I was well aware, that in my case there were many reasons to doubt of my own success. The machinery was new and...
Page 77 - City-Hall - yea the whole Park, be filled with MOURNERS! But, remember, offer no violence to Judge Edwards! Bend meekly, and receive the chains wherewith you are to be bound! Keep the peace! Above all things keep the peace!
Page 28 - As I had occasion to pass daily to and from the buildingyard, while my boat was in progress, I have often loitered unknown near the idle groups of strangers, gathering in little circles, and heard various inquiries as to the object of this new vehicle. The language was uniformly that of scorn, or sneer, or ridicule.
Page 76 - Judge Edwards, the tool of the Aristocracy, against the People. Mechanics and Workingmen, a deadly blow has been struck at your Liberty. The prize for which your fathers fought has been robbed from you. The freemen of the North are now on a level with the slaves of the South, with no other privileges than laboring, that drones may fatten on your life blood.
Page 28 - When, (said he), I was building my first steamboat* at New York, the- project was viewed by the public critics with indifference, or with contempt, as a visionary scheme. My friends, indeed, were civil, but they were shy. They listened with patience to my explanations, but with a settled cast of incredulity on their countenances.
Page 124 - The expense of these trials to be borne by you," you agree to insert the words, "The vessel to be at my risk as regards loss, or damage from any source." The last clause of your letter to read as follows: "In addition to this, if the umpire decides that she is faster than any vessel in the United States, you are to have the right, instead of accepting her at that time, to send her to England, match her against anything built there, which in your judgment gives her a fair chance in a trial of speed,...
Page 60 - The vessel to be raised by this apparatus was floated over a platform of wood, sunk to the depth of about ten feet below the surface of the water, and suspended from a strongly built wooden frame-work by sixteen iron screws four and a half inches in diameter. This platform has several shores on its surface, which were brought to bear equally on the vessel's bottom, to prevent her from canting over on being raised out of the water. About thirty men were employed in working this apparatus, who, by...
Page 73 - ... danger, therefore, which threatens the stability of our Government and the liberty of the people is an undue accumulation and distribution of wealth. And I do conceive that real danger is to be apprehended from this source, notwithstanding that tendency to distribution which naturally grows out of the character of our statutes of conveyance, of inheritance, and descent of property; but by securing to the producing classes a fair, certain, and equitable compensation for their toil and skill, we...
Page 76 - American jury, and agreeably to that charge they have established the precedent that workingmen have no right to regulate the price of labor: or in other words, the Rich are the only judges of the wants of the Poor man.

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