The Gospel of the Redman

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World Wisdom, Inc, 2005 - History - 134 pages
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This Commemorative Edition of The Gospel of the Redman honors Ernest Thompson Seton, renowned naturalist, artist, and founder of the Boy Scouts of America. It features: a new Introduction by Seton's daughter; a new Foreword by Paul Goble; Seton's American Indian sketches; photographs from throughout Seton's life; an extensive bibliography of his works. Book jacket.
 

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Contents

THE GOSPEL OF THE REDMAN
1
THE ANCIENT WAY
31
BY THEIR FRUITS YE SHALL KNOW THEM
55
WABASHA
81
THE WISDOM OF THE OLD MEN
87
PROPHETS OF THE RED RACE
105
WHITE EXPRESSIONS OF INDIAN
113
WHITHER?
123
EPILOGUE
125
INDEX OF AMERICAN INDIAN NAMES
131
The Arctic Prairies 1911
135
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Ernest Thompson Seton was an artist and author. He was born in South Shields, England on August 14, 1860. Seton studied art at the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture in London. His 1898 collection of stories, Wild Animals I Have Known, led to the publication of more than forty other books. Seton lectured widely and established a youth group called the Woodcraft Indians that combined his love of the outdoors and his artistic talent. The activities of the Woodcraft Indians directly led to the formation of the Boy Scouts of America, which Seton co-founded in 1910. He was the author of the first Scout Manual. The Canadian Broadcasting Company has produced two film tributes of Seton, Keeper of the Wind in 1974 and Seton's Manitoba in 1984. Seton died on October 23, 1946.

Paul Goble was born in Haslemere, Surrey, England on September 27, 1933. He was a sharpshooter in the British military from 1951 to 1953. In 1959, he received a National Diploma in Design, with honors, from the Central School of Arts and Crafts in London. While working in freelance industrial design and teaching at Ravensbourne College of Art and Design, he and his first wife Dorothy Lee wrote four picture books. In 1977, he decided to become a full-time author and illustrator and accepted a position as the artist-in-residence at Mount Rushmore National Memorial. He and Lee divorced in 1978. He was best known for his picture books inspired by Native American culture and lore including Buffalo Woman, Iktomi and the Boulder: A Plains Indian Story, and Crow Chief: A Plains Indian Story. He received the Caldecott Medal in 1979 for The Girl Who Loved Wild Horses. He died from Parkinson's disease on January 5, 2017 at the age of 83.

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