The Modern World-system: Capitalist agriculture and the origins of the European world-economy in the sixteenth century, Volume 1

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An examination of the beginnings and early conditions of the European economic system elucidates the social effects of division of labor, class-formation, and international commerce.

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Contents

ON THE STUDY OF SOCIAL CHANGE
2
c 14501640
66
THE ABSOLUTE MONARCHY AND STATISM
132
Copyright

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About the author (1974)

Wallerstein studied at Columbia University, where he received his Ph.D. in sociology in 1959. His work has focused primarily on what he calls "world systems theory," which deals with the socioeconomic dynamics of global dependence and interdependence. As Wallerstein sees it, the wealthy nations of the world control and manipulate the destinies of weaker nations and keep them dependent. The world system is an outcome of historic global, political, and ideological forces leading to Western hegemony.