A Select Collection of Old Plays: Roaring girl, or, Moll Cutpurse

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J. Nichols, 1780 - English drama
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Page 356 - Your reverend mother Is grown a very old woman in two hours. I found them winding of Marcello's corse ; And there is such a solemn melody, 'Tween doleful songs, tears, and sad elegies — Such as old...
Page 461 - In the month of May, namely, on May-day in the morning, every man, except impediment, would walk into the sweet meadows and green woods, there to rejoice their spirits with the beauty and savour of sweet flowers, and with the harmony of birds, praising God in their kind...
Page 339 - ... but give him one hearty kiss, and you shall put us both into one coffin. Fetch a looking-glass :* see if his breath will not stain it ; or pull out some feathers from my pillow, and lay them to his lips. Will you lose him for a little pains-taking? HORT. Your kindest office is to pray for him. COR. Alas! I would not pray for him yet. He may live to lay me i'th' ground, and pray for me, if you'll let me come to him.
Page 298 - Good God, let her sleep ever! For I have known her wake an hundred nights When all the pillow where she laid her head Was brine-wet with her tears.
Page 339 - Let me come to him ; give me him as he is ; if he be turn'd to earth, let me but give him one hearty kiss, and you shall put us both into one coffin. Fetch a looking-glass, see if his breath will not stain it ; or pull out some feathers from my pillow, and lay them to his lips : will you lose him for a little painstaking ? Hor.
Page 254 - A foolish idle dream: Methought I walk'd about the mid of night Into a church-yard, where a goodly yew-tree Spread her large root in ground: under that yew, As I sate sadly leaning on a grave, Checquer'd with cross sticks, there came stealing in Your duchess and my husband ; one of them A pick-ax bore, th' other a rusty spade, And in rough terms they 'gan to challenge me About this yew.
Page 374 - White Divel, or, the Tragedy of Paulo Giordano Ursini, Duke of Brachiano, with the Life and Death of Vittoria Corombona, the famous Venetian Curtizan.
Page 71 - tis an university! Who not sees? As scholars there, so here men take degrees And follow the same studies all alike. Scholars learn first logic and rhetoric. So does a prisoner: with fine...
Page 295 - Join'd to th' condition of the present time, Takes from you all the fruits of noble pity, Such a corrupted trial have you made Both of your life and beauty, and been styl'd No less an ominous fate, than blazing stars To Princes. Hear your sentence; you are confin'd Unto a house of converts.
Page 320 - ... oft, picks out the worm, and brings present remedy. The fish, glad of ease, but ingrateful to her that did it, that the bird may not talk largely...

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