The New Pearl Harbor: Disturbing Questions about the Bush Administration and 9/11

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Olive Branch Press, Jan 1, 2004 - Political Science - 214 pages
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Taking to heart the idea that those who benefit from a crime ought to be investigated, here the eminent theologian David Ray Griffin sifts through the evidence about the attacks of 9/11 - stories from the mainstream press, reports from abroad, the work of other researchers, and the contradictory words of members of the Bush administration themselves - and finds that, taken together, they cast serious doubt on the official story of that tragic day

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Mr. Griffen gives a step by step insight into the real questions and answers with unbiased words and simple facts. He begs the question as to why the American public has been willing to swallow this horse s*#( which is the only real conspiracy, that the government has been selling since day one.
Having read accounts both pro and con on the subject and though I was without a doubt already convinced as to who and what had taken place, I still kept as open mind as possible willing to concede to any actual fact we were sold if it actually made sense. Nothing to date has. Mr. Griffen joins a growin number of voices, highly intelligent, thought seeking, researched voices who motivate the reader to raise theirs as well. And though I'd quieted mine somewhat as I was simply growing horse, I've only strengthened my resolve at making certain at least my children and their children will know the kind of World in which we really live. And it belongs to? The Rothchilds, the Illuminate and Satan.
 

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How sad.
People try to create whatever reality they find fitting, no matter how high and twisted the card tower becomes, just so they don't have to face a terrifying reality that could fracture their precious set of beliefs...

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About the author (2004)

David Ray Griffin has been Professor of Philosophy of Religion at the Claremont School of Theology in California for over 30 years.

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