North and South

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Sep 4, 2008 - Fiction - 496 pages
`she tried to settle that most difficult problem for women, how much was to be utterly merged in obedience to authority, and how much might be set apart for freedom in working.' North and South is a novel about rebellion. Moving from the industrial riots of discontented millworkers through to the unsought passions of a middle-class woman, and from religious crises of conscience to the ethics of naval mutiny, it poses fundamental questions about the nature of social authority and obedience. Through the story of Margaret Hale, the middle-class southerner who moves to the northern industrial town of Milton, Gaskell skilfully explores issues of class and gender in the conflict between Margaret's ready sympathy with the workers and her growing attraction to the charismatic mill ownder, John Thornton. This new revised and expanded edition sets the novel in the context of Victorian social and medical debate. ABOUT THE SERIES: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the widest range of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

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User Review  - VeritysVeranda - LibraryThing

Four stars for a work of fiction that is set in a world which can still resonate with the events in the world today, characters who have meaningful conversations/arguements and the lovers have a happy ... Read full review

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User Review  - Annesanse - LibraryThing

I read this book mainly because I found and LOVED the mini series based on it on Netflix. I have to say that this is one of those rare exceptions where I like the movie more than the book. While the ... Read full review

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About the author (2008)


Sally Shuttleworth is Professor of Literature at the University of Sheffield.

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