Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 73

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W. Blackwood, 1853
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Page 137 - And he spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall: he spake also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes.
Page 402 - For John the Baptist came neither eating bread nor drinking wine; and ye say, He hath a devil. The Son of man is come eating and drinking; and ye say, Behold a gluttonous man, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners!
Page 409 - ... to love him as myself, and to do to all men as I would they should do unto me.
Page 393 - And every man that striveth for the mastery is temperate in all things. Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown ; but we an incorruptible.
Page 10 - That after the year 1800 of the Christian era there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in any of the said States otherwise than in punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted to have been personally guilty.
Page 143 - So many mermaids, tended her i' the eyes, And made their bends adornings. At the helm A seeming mermaid steers; the silken tackle Swell with the touches of those flower-soft hands. That yarely frame the office. From the barge A strange invisible perfume hits the sense Of the adjacent wharfs. The city cast Her people out upon her; and Antony, Enthroned i...
Page 409 - ... to learn and labour truly to get mine own living, and to do my duty in that state of life unto which it shall please God to call me, Catcckist.
Page 365 - I told my opponents the only man who could "put me down" was myself, and I trusted I should do nothing to bring about that result. If thrust out of my own pulpit, I made up my mind to lecture from city to city, from town to town, from village to village, nay...
Page 109 - Having quitted the Borders, to seek new renown, Is coming, by long Quarto stages to Town : And beginning with ROKEBY (the job's sure to pay.) Means to do all the Gentlemen's Seats on the way. Now, the Scheme is (though none of our Hackneys can beat him) To start a fresh Poet through Highgate to meet him ; ' , Who, by means of quick proofs— no revises— long coaches — May do a few Villas, before Sc — TT approaches.
Page 109 - And beginning with Rokeby (the job's sure to pay) Means to do all the Gentlemen's Seats on the way. Now, the Scheme is (though none of our hackneys can beat him) To start a fresh Poet through Highgate to meet him; Who, by means of quick proofs — no revises — long coaches — May do a few Villas, before Sc — tt approaches.

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