Philosophical Practice

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Academic Press, Nov 8, 2001 - Psychology - 411 pages
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This book provides a look at philosophical practice from the viewpoint of the practitioner or prospective practitioner. It answers the questions: What is philosophical practice? What are its aims and methods? How does philosophical counseling differ from psychological counseling and other forms of psychotherapy. How are philosophical practitioners educated and trained? How do philosophical practitioners relate to other professions? What are the politics of philosophical practice? How does one become a practitioner? What is APPA Certification? What are the prospects for philosophical practice in the USA and elsewhere?
Handbook of Philosophical Practice provides an account of philosophy's current renaissance as a discipline of applied practice while critiquing the historical, social, and cultural forces which have contributed to its earlier descent into obscurity.

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Modes of Philosophical Practice
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Politics of Philosophical Practice

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Page xxiii - All that we are is the result of what we have thought: it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts.
Page iv - The whole function of philosophy ought to be to find out what definite difference it will make to you and me, at definite instants of our life, if this world-formula or that world-formula be the true one.
Page 17 - A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks. It is rather the same thing that is happening to the English language. It becomes ugly and inaccurate because our thoughts are foolish, but the slovenliness of our language makes it easier for us to have foolish thoughts.
Page iv - Many also, perhaps most men, either through defect of mind or want of education, remain unfit during the whole course of their lives; yet have they, infants as well as those of riper years, a human nature. Wherefore man is made fit for society not by nature, but by education.
Page 16 - ... men that take their instruction from the authority of books, and not from their own meditation, to be as much below the condition of ignorant men as men endued with true science are above it.
Page 17 - But an effect can become a cause, reinforcing the original cause and prixlucing the same effect in an intensified form, and so on indefinitely. A man may take to drink because he feels himself to be a failure, and then fail all the more completely because he drinks.
Page 15 - It was found that the background linguistic system (in other words, the grammar) of each language is not merely a reproducing instrument for voicing ideas but rather is itself the shaper of ideas...
Page xv - The great conquerors, from Alexander to Caesar, and from Caesar to Napoleon, influenced profoundly the lives of subsequent generations. But the total effect of this influence shrinks to insignificance, if compared to the entire transformation of human habits and human mentality produced by ... men of thought from Thales to the present day, men individually powerless, but ultimately the rulers of the world.

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About the author (2001)

Lou Marinoff, a Commonwealth Scholar, earned his doctorate in Philosophy of Science at University College London. After holding Research Fellowships at University College and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, he became a Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of British Columbia, and was also Moderator of the Canadian Business and Professional Ethics Network at UBC's Center for Applied Ethics. He is currently an Associate Professor, and Chair of the Philosophy Department, at The City College of New York. Lou has been a philosophical practitioner for ten years. He is past president of the American Society for Philosophy, Counseling and Psychotherapy (ASPCP), and founding president of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association (APPA). He is a Fellow of the Institute for Local Government at the University of Arizona, and a Fellow of the World Economic Forum (Davos). He publishes regularly in decision theory, ethics, philosophical practice, and other fields. He is author of an international best-seller, Plato Not Prozac (HarperCollins, NY, 1999), published in twenty languages. His philosophical practice and pioneering of the profession have received national and international media attention. In demand as a speaker to all kinds of groups and organizations, Lou travels far and wide, helping to promote a global philosophical renaissance.

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