Narrative of the Euphrates Expedition: Carried on by Order of the British Government During the Years 1835, 1836, and 1837

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1868 - Euphrates Expedition, 1835-1837 - 564 pages
 

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Page 260 - ... be more exemplary than their conduct, and that of all on board ; scarcely a word was spoken, not a murmur was heard, and death was met with that exemplary, degree of intrepidity and: resignation which have been displayed by every individual throughout the arduous and trying service in which we have been engaged since January, 1835. " Having already given a faithful account of the short but eventful period of about twelve minutes, occupied by the beginning, the progress, and termination of the...
Page 261 - ... result when a similar, but less violent gale, sent my little vessel to the bottom of this river in 1831 ; for I had not then the misery of deploring the loss of a single life, and my little schooner was afloat and continuing the descent in less than twelve hours ; whereas, all our efforts as yet have failed even to find the remains of the vessel. Not a ripple, or the slightest trace of the unfortunate Tigris...
Page 493 - ... may obtain a tolerable notion of their sculpture and other ornamental art. The most imposing remains which seem certainly assignable to the Parthian period are those of Hatra, or El-Hndhr, visited by Mr. Layard in 1846, and described at length by Mr. Ross in the ninth volume of the " Journal of the Royal Geographical Society,"
Page 258 - ... powerless, and the waves, rising to four or five feet, forcing their way in at the windows. Lieutenant Cockburn, the Messrs. Staunton, and some of the men made ineffectual attempts to keep out the water, for the fate of the vessel was already decided ; and the fore part of the deck being under water...
Page 7 - Nile, although his situation did not allow him to make any attempt for that purpose. Nero, however, was more active. He sent two centurions into Ethiopia, with orders to explore the unknown fountains of this river ; but they returned without having accomplished their errand.
Page 259 - ... the operation of sinking itself did not consume more than three ; indeed the gale was so very violent, that I doubt whether the most powerful vessel, such as a frigate, could have resisted it, unless she were already secured to the bank; and for this there was, in our case, little or no time, as it was barely possible, in the position of our consort, to make fast and save the vessel. " I had little, or rather no hope, that the Euphrates could have escaped, but the intrepid skill of Lieutenant...
Page 261 - ... as well as the manifest advantages, facilities, and cheapness of this line of communication. The hurricane has been, it is true, a most trying and calamitous event ; but, I believe, it is regarded by all, even at this early day, as having no more to do with the navigation of the Euphrates in other...
Page 259 - ... distance from the vessel to the shore was very short, we indulged the hope that the rest of our brave companions had reached the bank lower down. For an instant I saw the keel of the Tigris uppermost, near the stern. She went down bow foremost, and having struck the bottom in that position, she probably turned round on the bow as a pivot, and thus showed part of her keel for an instant at the other extremity ; but her paddlebeams, floats, and parts of the sides were already broken up and actually...
Page 262 - Scarcely had we cast off from the bank, when at mid day on Saturday last, we in company with the Tigris, had stopped to take in wood, when a dense cloud of dust was seen to rise high into the air, on the right bank. For some minutes it was doubtful whether it would not pass off to our right, but soon it was apparent that it would be otherwise. Preparation was made to meet the squall by furling the awnings, &c. As soon as the Tigris...
Page 261 - God to spare us, to demonstrate the speed, economy, and commercial advantages of the river Euphrates, provided the decision of Ministers shall be in the true spirit of Englishmen — to give it a fair trial, rather than abandon the original purpose in consequence of an unforeseen and, as it...

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