Heartbreak Hotel

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Simon & Schuster, 1976 - Fiction - 252 pages
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The insightful, troubling tale of the coming of age of a privileged young Southern woman during the turbulent Civil Rights era. In Montgomery, Alabama, Martin Luther King Jr. has organized a bus boycott. In Tuscaloosa, outrage surrounds the entrance of the state university's first black student. But at little Randolph University, sweltering in the summer heat, life remains dreamily the same. At Kappa House, the sorority sisters talk of who has pinned whom, and whether they can sneak past their housemother so they can party at an out-of-town bar. Even among this privileged group, pretty, popular Kappa sister Maggie Deloach is unquestionably one of the elite...until she commits a single act of defiance and courage that forever alters the way others think of her, and how Maggie thinks of herself.

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HEARTBREAK HOTEL 2K

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The year is 1956. Eisenhower is president, the United States is prosperous, and Elvis is King. Underneath this happy era of relative peace are the powder kegs of the Civil and Women's Rights movements ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
13
Section 2
22
Section 3
30
Copyright

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About the author (1976)

Novelist Anne Rivers Siddons was born in Fairburn, Georgia in 1936. She studied at Auburn University in Alabama and Oglethorpe University in Atlanta. Siddons was an editor and columnist for the Auburn Plainsman, senior editor for Atlanta magazine and worked in advertising. Her treatment of the South in her novels often earns comparisons to Margaret Mitchell. One of her books, Peachtree Road, won her Georgia author of the year honors (1988). her novels include: Sweetwater Creek, Off Season and Burnt Mountain. She and her husband, Heyward Siddons, shuttle between a sprawling home in Brookhaven, Atlanta, and their summer home in Brooklin, Maine.

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