A Voyage in the South Seas, in the Years 1812, 1813, and 1814: With Particular Details of the Gallipagos and Washington Islands

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Sir R. Phillips, 1823 - Galapagos Islands - 126 pages
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Page 122 - Many of my guns had been rendered useless by the enemy's shot, and many of them had had their whole crews destroyed. We manned them again from those which were disabled, and one gun in particular was three times manned — fifteen men were slain at it in the course of the action ! but strange as it may appear the captain of it escaped with only a slight wound.
Page 123 - I directed him, after he had been about ten minutes on board, to return to his own ship, to be prepared for defending and destroying her in case of attack. He took with him several of my wounded, leaving three of his boat's crew on board to make room for them.
Page 124 - The enemy, from the smoothness of the water, and the impossibility of our reaching him with our carronades, and the little apprehension that was excited by our fire, which had now become much slackened, was enabled to take aim at us as at a target ; his shot never missed our hull, and my ship was cut up in a manner which was, perhaps, never before witnessed...
Page 47 - Many of them were of a size to weigh upwards of three hundred weight; and nothing, perhaps, can be more disagreeable or clumsy than they are in their external appearance. Their motion resembles strongly that of the elephant ; their steps slow, regular, and heavy ; they carry their body about a foot from the ground, and their legs and feet bear no slight resemblance to the animal to which I have likened them ; their neck is from...
Page 123 - PAojfce, where we were again exposed to a dreadful raking fire. My ship was now totally unmanageable; yet as her head was toward the enemy, and he to leeward of me, I still hoped to be able to board him.
Page 8 - Catherine's and the continent; there is every variety to give beauty to the scene; handsome villages and houses built around; shores which gradually ascend in mountains, covered to their summits with trees which remain in constant verdure; a climate always temperate and healthy; small islands scattered here and there, equally covered with verdure; the soil extremely productive; all combine to render it in appearance the most delightful country in the world.
Page 122 - The only rope not cut was the flyingjib haulyards; and that being the only sail I could set, I caused it to be hoisted, my cable to be cut, and ran down on both ships, with an intention of laying the Phabe on board.
Page 110 - To the chiefs of the distant tribes, to whom I distributed the different kinds of seeds, I made the same promise. I also gave them several English hogs of a superior breed, which they were very anxious to procure. I left in charge of Wilson some male and female goats, and as I had a number of young Gallipagos tortoises, I distributed several among the chiefs, and permitted a great many to escape into the bushes and among the grass.
Page 23 - The intricacies of their country-dance were too great for us to attempt ; they were greatly delighted in by those who knew them, and admitted a display of much grace. With their grace, their beauty of person and complexion, and with their modesty, we were delighted, and could almost fancy we had gotten amongst our own fair country-women ; but in one moment the illusion vanished.
Page 123 - The slaughter on board my ship had now become horrible, the enemy continuing to rake us, and we unable to bring a gun to bear. I therefore directed a hawser to be bent to the sheet anchor, and the anchor to be cut from the bows to bring her head round ; this succeeded. We again got our broadside to bear, and as the enemy was much crippled and unable to hold his own, I have no doubt...

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