Marmion;: A Tale of Flodden Field

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J. Ballantyne and Company, 1808 - Flodden, Battle of, England, 1513 - 377 pages
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User Review  - antiquary - LibraryThing

A genuinely effective story though I must admit I skip the lengthy introductions to each section describing Sxcottish scenery. "Young Lochinvar" and "the hand of Douglas is his own" are great bits, as is Wilton's defiance of the ghostly herald's summons. Read full review

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Page 259 - But, ere he alighted at Netherby gate, The bride had consented, the gallant came late ; For a laggard in love, and a dastard in war Was to wed the fair Ellen of brave Lochinvar. So boldly he entered the Netherby Hall, Among bridesmen, and kinsmen, and brothers, and all.
Page 259 - So stately his form, and so lovely her face, that never a hall such a galliard did grace; while her mother did fret, and her father did fume. and the bridegroom stood dangling his bonnet and plume ; and the bride-maidens whispered, "Twere better by far to have matched our fair cousin with young Lochinvar.
Page 362 - O, woman ! in our hours of ease, Uncertain, coy, and hard to please, And variable as the shade By the light quivering aspen made ; When pain and anguish wring the brow, A ministering angel thou...
Page 258 - LOCHINVAR. LADY HERON'S SONG. 12. O, young Lochinvar is come out of the west, Through all the wide Border his steed was the best, And save his good broad-sword he weapons had none ; He rode all unarmed, and he rode all alone. So faithful in love, and so dauntless in war, There never was knight like the young Lochinvar.
Page 359 - Ask me not what the maiden feels, Left in that dreadful hour alone: Perchance her reason stoops or reels; Perchance a courage, not her own, Braces her mind to desperate tone. The scattered van of England wheels; She only said, as loud in air The tumult roared, "Is Wilton there?" They fly! or maddened by despair Fight but to die — "Is Wilton there?
Page 338 - Lord Marmion turned — well was his need — And dashed the rowels in his steed, Like arrow through the archway sprung, The ponderous grate behind him rung; To pass there was such scanty room, The bars descending razed his plume.
Page 359 - Is Wilton there ?" — With that, straight up the hill there rode Two horsemen drenched with gore, And in their arms, a helpless load, A wounded knight they bore.
Page 335 - Part we in friendship from your land, And, noble earl, receive my hand." But Douglas round him drew his cloak, Folded his arms, and thus he spoke: " My manors, halls, and bowers shall still Be open at my sovereign's will, To each one whom he lists, howe'er Unmeet to be the owner's peer.
Page 356 - Then marked they, dashing broad and far, The broken billows of the war, And plumed crests of chieftains brave, Floating like foam upon the wave ; But nought distinct they see : Wide raged the battle on the plain ; Spears shook, and falchions flashed amain ; Fell England's arrow-flight like rain ; Crests rose, and stooped, and rose again, Wild and disorderly. Amid the scene of tumult, high They saw Lord Marmion's falcon fly : And stainless Tunstall's banner white, And Edmund Howard's lion bright...
Page 353 - Blount and Fitz-Eustace rested still With Lady Clare upon the hill ; On which (for far the day was spent) The western sunbeams now were bent. The cry they heard, its meaning knew, Could plain their distant comrades view : Sadly to Blount did Eustace say, " Unworthy office here to stay ! No hope of gilded spurs to-day. — But see 1 look up ! — on Flodden bent The Scottish foe has fired his tent.

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