Handbook of Building Construction: Data for Architects, Designing and Constructing Engineers, and Contractors ...

Front Cover
McGraw-Hill Book Company, Incorporated, 1920 - Building
 

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Contents

48
22
ART PAGE
25
55
28
Concentrated load systems
32
Shear
38
DESIGN of PURLINs
41
WATERLEss ToILET CoNv ENIENCEs
42
Specifications
43
Algebraic treatment
50
ART PAGE
53
Wind load stresses by the graphical
56
Prime movers 1166
60
Straightline formula
62
Location of mortar supply 827
63
BENDING AND DIRECT STREssCoNCRETE
68
Outdoor privies 1232
69
Rainfall 11
78
111
85
33
92
DE signING AND DETAiLING OF STRUCTURAL MEMBERs AND CoNNECTIONs
95
Swinging scaffolds 828
96
Deterioration of timber 889
99
BUILDING MATERIALs 887
100
26
107
Considerations in the design of steel
115
CASTIRoN LINTELs
123
Nature of lightning
130
Sequence of trades on building
132
at the supports
144
ART PAGE 157 Reinforcement details of the engi
157
73
163
Reinforced concrete stairs
167
Storing of cement 951
172
Girders of solid section
173
a Details of trussed girders
180
74
184
Purlins subjected to unsymmetrical
189
WooDEN Columns
195
Properties of paint films 1011 BUILDING AND SHEATHING PAPERS FELTs
199
Column bases
201
Specifications should be definite 1074
204
Steel column details
207
ART PAGE
214
Systematic procedure advisable 1045 d Reinforcement 1055
215
1
217
BEARING PLATES AND BASEs For BEAMs
227
Erection of iron stairs
238
Lateral resistance of wood screws
239
Air compressors 879
240
Washers
245
b Guns 881
246
Compression splices
254
SPLICES AND CoNNECTIONsSTEEL MEMBERs
260
988
291
Definitions 952
299
i
302
General requirements 952
306
Equipment
312
Oxygas cutting and welding equip
321
neer or contractor
322
Scale and conventions
323
b Spacers
324
a Rod spacing
325
Columns
326
b Spiral hooping
327
g Rod splices
328
Rod sizes
329
STRUCTURAL DATA
332
Weights of merchandise
334
Fire prevention and fire protection
336
PROTECTION OF STRUCTURAL STEEL FROM FIRE 5 Effects of heat on steel
337
Intensity of heat in a fire
338
Plaster
339
FIRERESISTIVE Column CoNSTRUCTION Reinforced concrete columns
340
Coverings for various steel columns
341
Hollow tile columns
342
Scuppers
343
Brick arch floor construction
344
Simplex floor arch
345
New York reinforced tile floor
346
ART Found ATIONs PAGE
347
Sedimentation 11 83
349
Electrical quantities 12S5
350
a Igneous rocks 899
353
Electromotive force or electrical
356
Earth excavating equipment 833
357
Chemical treatment 11 83
364
Pile driving and pile pulling equip
368
Hand lift pumps
377
Bracing trusses
384
SLowBURNING TIMBER MILL CoN
391
Kinds of cast iron 919
393
Basement floors
397
b Tile arch floors
398
Concrete floors
399
Types of reinforcement 958
400
Design of joists
402
Details of connections
404
b Connections of beams to columns
405
Separators
406
Special framing
407
b Elevator wells
408
a Design of hip and valley rafters
409
Monitors Floor AND Roof FRAMINGCoNCRETE 78 Practical considerations 79 Slab steel arrangementordinary type
410
Marking of bent rods
411
Special Tbeam design
412
Long span rectangular beams
414
Hollowtile construction
416
173
421
Handling forms for concrete
424
Working stresses 958
425
Construction in which brick bearing walls are used instead of ex 436 438 438 terior columns
440
130
441
Openings
443
Capitals at exterior columns
444
Placing steel
445
FLOOR SURFACEs 107 Wood floor surfaces
447
b Hardwood flooring
448
Refinishing wood floors
449
b Rubber tiling
450
Terrazo finish
451
Floor OPENINGs AND ATTACHMENTs 115 Floor openings 116 Floor attachments
452
GROUND Floors 117 Drainage
453
Waterproofing
454
Electrical machines and apparatus 1290
455
Connections between purlins
460
Causes of incrustation 1186
463
Wind loads
466
65
473
70
482
77
495
82
502
DETAILED DESIGN of A Wooden Roof
505
Design of joints
511
Wiring methods 1300
520
176
522
General drawing and estimated
524
183
531
159
532
92
536
191
537
DETAILED DESIGN of A TRUss witH KNEE
542
Determination of stresses
548
Design of joints
554
General methods for determination
561
Hingeless arches
568
Design of members and joints for
576
Analysis of stresses in a hammer
586
ART PAGE
589
Roof DRAINAGE
599
In general 1189
603
Structure 931
606
PART IIIMECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
608
Masonry walls below grade
609
Tools 932
613
Wood and plaster walls
615
Sand lime brick 91 5
620
Gypsum block partitions
621
WINDows
627
Metal clad doors
633
Definitions
634
a Hand benders 861
635
Landings and winders
639
Elevator service 1371
640
TANks
645
Gasolene tanks
651
253
657
a girder
666
Depth of keystone
667
LoNG SPAN CONSTRUCTION For OBTAINING
669
Steam 1083
680
Estimating STEEL BUILDINGs 1028
681
290
688
Main and house sewers 1245
691
HEATING VENTILATION AND Power 1080
692
297
699
b Snow load
700
Numerical example
706
a Drum mixers 862
708
GENERAL DESIGNING DATA
711
Town halls
723
Hydraulic rams 1199
724
ART PAGE
725
Light and illumination 1317
728
Vents 1248
730
Air 1083
734
Churches
737
Charitable purpose buildings
744
Distribution curves 1318
746
City water lifts 1207
748
Nontransmission of sound
751
13
754
Vocational schools and S m i th
757
132
760
Physical laboratory
763
Study rooms
764
Play grounds
765
Pipe and wire shafts
766
Office requirements
767
General plan
768
General design
769
Submission of plans
771
Ventilation and light
773
Floor drains
774
Where water and sewerage systems are not available
775
Manure pit
778
Locating an industry
779
Shipping facilities
780
Type of buildings
782
Loft buildings industrial terminals
783
Foundations
784
Lighting
785
137
787
Power plants
788
Metal working industries
789
Machine shops
790
Pattern shops
791
Textile mills
792
Shoe factories
793
Types
794
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Page 757 - D — A building with masonry walls, but otherwise ordinary or joist construction and wood finish. Type E — A frame building constructed with wood above foundation, with or without slate or other semi-fireproof material on roof.
Page 330 - Every floor shall be of sufficient strength to bear safely the weight to be imposed thereon in addition to the weight of the materials of which the floor is composed...
Page 8 - The perpendicular distance between the lines of action of the two forces is called the arm, and the product of one of the forces and the arm is called the moment of the couple.
Page 567 - Rd (16) where d is the perpendicular distance from R to the center of gravity of the section under consideration. This moment can also be expressed in other terms. If e of Fig.
Page 141 - T-beams shall not exceed one-fourth of the span length of the beam, and its overhanging width on either side of the web shall not exceed eight times the thickness of the slab nor one-half the clear distance to the next beam.
Page 95 - These are in one class of equal length, and in another class of unequal length. Notice also the fillet and curve at outer edge. The method of increasing the weight is shown by the full lines. It will be seen, therefore, that for an angle with certain size of legs the effect of increasing weight is to change slightly the length of legs, and to increase the thickness. In case of angles, the distinction between "standard...
Page 465 - ... the leeward side of a shop building, or monitors at the ridge, will relieve all or a part of the pressure due to suction. This action should be recognized and provided for to the extent of making all members capable of resisting a reversal of stress, and by providing proper anchorage of trusses. 16. Snow Loads. — The snow load to be carried by a roof truss is a variable quantity, depending upon the slope of the roof, the latitude, and the humidity. Dry freshly fallen snow weighs about 8 Ib....
Page 338 - ... thin edge in the projecting flange or arms of the cross sections does not exceed three-quarters of an inch in thickness. The thickness of the fireproof covering on all surfaces measuring more than three-quarters of an inch wide and measuring in a direction perpendicular to such surfaces shall be not less than that specified for interior columns in the beginning of this section, and all spaces, including channels or chases between the fireproof covering and the metal of the columns, shall be filled...
Page 330 - ... or other masonry arches or with concrete or reinforced concrete slabs; wood may be used only for under and upper floors, windows and door frames, sashes, doors, interior finish, hand rails for stairs, necessary sleepers bedded in the cement, and for isolated furrings bedded in mortar. There shall be no air space between the top of any floor arches and the floor boarding.
Page 331 - Every plank, slab and arch, and every floor beam carrying one hundred square feet of floor or less, shall be of sufficient strength to bear safely the combined dead and live load supported by it, but the floor live loads may be reduced for other parts of the structure as follows: — In all buildings except armories, garages, gymnasiums, storage buildings, wholesale stores, and assembly halls, for all flat slabs of over one hundred square feet area, reinforced in two or more directions and for all...

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