Japanese Proverbs and Sayings

Front Cover
Daniel Crump Buchanan
University of Oklahoma Press, 1965 - Foreign Language Study - 280 pages
The proverbs and sayings of a people are the best source for understanding their national character. This collection of Japanese proverbs and sayings, the first published in English, provides insight into the complex and, to Westerners, often baffling tenets of Japanese civilization.

Here are 2,500 proverbs and idiomatic expressions that have been selected as illustratie of Japanese thought. Many have English parallels, but even after reading the apparently uniquely Japanese sayings, one must agree with the proverb, "Ninjo ni kokkyo nashi," "There are no barriers to human nature."
 

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Contents

Japanese Characteristics Aesthetics
3
Ambition
7
Amorousness
10
Awareness of Difficulty
15
Body Consciousness
18
Caution
37
Class Consciousness
42
Coarseness
47
Kindness
143
Learning
146
Loyalty
148
Memory
150
Obligations
151
Optimism
152
Patience
157
Pessimism
164

Courage
49
Courtesy
51
Criticalness
53
Cruelty
59
Curiosity
61
Deceit
62
Detail
67
Discipline
70
Drink
79
Emotion
82
Family
88
Fatalism
104
Friendship
108
Generosity and Hospitality
110
Gregariousness
112
Honesty
116
Honor
118
Imitation
123
Immaturity
124
Indirectness of Speech
131
Industry
139
Practicality
172
Pride
182
Punctuality
185
Realism
187
Respect
193
Responsibility
199
Rudeness
201
Selfishness
204
Sensitivity
208
Shame
211
Simplicity
216
Submissiveness
218
Superstition
220
Suspicion
232
Thrift
238
Tolerance
241
Wit
254
Women
263
Index
271
Copyright

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About the author (1965)

Daniel Crump Buchanan was born in Japan and has spent much of his life there as a teacher in Japanese high schools and colleges and as a Presbyterian missionary. Educated in the United States, Mr. Buchanan received the B.A. degree from Fredericksburg College, the M.A. degree from Washington and Lee University, and the Ph.D. degree from Hartford Seminary Foundation.

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