Annual Report of the Operations of the United States Life-Saving Service for the Fiscal Year Ending ...

Front Cover
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 328 - The patrolman after discovering your vessel ashore and burning a warning signal, hastens to his station or the telephone for assistance. If the use of a boat is practicable, either the large lifeboat is launched from its ways in the station and proceeds to the wreck by water, or the lighter surfboat is hauled overland to a point opposite the wreck and launched, as circumstances may require.
Page 329 - Should it be inexpedient to use either the lifeboat or surfboat, recourse will be had to the wreck gun and beach apparatus for the rescue by the breeches buoy or the life car. A shot with a small line attached will be fired across your vessel. Get hold of the line as soon as possible and haul on board until you get a tailblock with a whip or endless line rove through it.
Page 331 - On the last trip of the life car, the hatch must be secured by the inside hatch bar. In many instances two men can be landed in the breeches buoy at the same time by each putting a leg through a leg of the breeches and holding on to the lifts of the buoy.
Page 327 - All life-saving and lifeboat stations are fully supplied with boats, wreck-guns, beach apparatus, restoratives, etc. Houses of refuge are supplied with boats, provisions, and restoratives, but not manned by crews ; a keeper, however, resides in each throughout the year, who, after every storm, is required to make extended excursions along the coast, with a view of ascertaining if any shipwreck has occurred and finding and succoring any persons that may have been cast ashore. Houses of refuge are...
Page 330 - Take particular care that there are no turns of the whip line around the hawser. To prevent this, take the end of the hawser up between the parts of the whip before making it fast. When the hawser is made fast, the whip cast off from the hawser, and your signal seen by the lifesaving crew, they will haul the hawser taut and by means of the whip will haul off to your...
Page 331 - ... through the sand or over bad roads to where your vessel is stranded. Lights on the beach will indicate their arrival, and the sound of cannon firing from the shore may be taken as evidence that a line has been fired across your vessel. Therefore, upon hearing the cannon, make strict search aloft, fore and aft, for the shot line, for it is almost certain to be there.
Page 327 - Most of the life-saving and lifeboat stations are provided with the International Code of Signals, and vessels can, by opening communication, be reported ; or obtain the latitude and longitude of the station, where determined; or information as to the weather probabilities in most cases; or, if crippled or disabled, a steam tug or revenue cutter will be telegraphed for, where facilities for telegraphing exist, to the nearest port, if requested.
Page 331 - Circumstances may arise, owing to the strength of the current or set, or the danger of the wreck breaking up immediately, when it would be impossible to send off the hawser. In such a case a breeches buoy or life car will be hauled off instead by the whip, or sent off to you by the shot line, and you will be hauled ashore through the surf.
Page 329 - Ьдоу or the life car. A shot with a small line attached will be fired across your vessel. Get hold of the line as soon as possible and haul on board until you get a tail block with a whip or endless line rove through it.
Page 328 - ... is hauled overland to a point opposite the wreck and launched, as circumstances may require. Upon the boat reaching your vessel, the directions and orders of the keeper (who always commands and steers the boat) should be implicitly obeyed. Any headlong rushing and crowding should be prevented, and the captain of the vessel should remain on board, to preserve order, until every other person has left. Women, children, helpless persons, and passengers should be passed into the boat first. Goods...

Bibliographic information